login   |    register

135
Another Italeri LCVP

1:35 landing craft vehicles personnel (lcvp)

what's in it?
LCVP model is Italeri 1/35 kit; Tommaso changed the crew's heads and hands with Hornet's ones and the arms from Dragon figures. Cargo supplies come from various kits (Italeri, Verlinden, Royal Model, etc....) Airbrushed with Gunze and Tamiya acrylic colors. Weathered with Humbrol and Schmincke Mussini oils.
  • Tommaso_LCVP-02
  • Tommaso_LCVP-03
  • Tommaso_LCVP-04
  • Tommaso_LCVP-05
  • Tommaso_LCVP-06
  • Tommaso_LCVP-07
  • Tommaso_LCVP-08
  • Tommaso_LCVP-09

About the Author

About Tommaso Porro (tommaso66)
FROM: TRIESTE, ITALY

I'm a 39 years old modeller.. Unfortunately my engagements leave me less modelling time than I want!! As many of you I started building models in the 70's with first 1/72 Airfix kits. My favourite subjects are WWII 1/35 armours figures and dioramas... but now big helicopters too!


Comments

I CONCUR !
JAN 13, 2006 - 04:37 AM
Hello Tommaso, For my money, that is the best model weathering finish I have seen, land, sea or air. The mixture of new and old rust on the ramp, the dark gunk along the waterline, excellent I am impressed that you did not excessively shadow and drybrush this 3-D piece, resulting in the reverse trompe-l'oeil 2-D effect sometimes seen. There are many articles about weather and washing, but I would like to know your techniques.
JAN 15, 2006 - 07:13 PM
very nice built boat..specially the weathering. i just hope they'll make more of LCs,PBs and PT boats in a 1/35 scale.
JAN 15, 2006 - 08:29 PM
Hello Fred, thank's a lot for your compliments! really! My weathering technique is the sum of varoius and several techniques that quite each modeller knows (filters, light washing, selective washing, dry brushing, light and heavy scraping, diffused wear, old and new rust, metal effect, pastels or chalks, etc.) because published in many articles or magazines. I would like to explain it all in detail... but my english is not so good in technical words ... so It'would become very difficult (and long) for me!! However if you want to know something specific (simple questions) I'll try to explain . Ciao Fred...and sorry! Tommaso
JAN 15, 2006 - 08:36 PM
Hi Tommaso, I have sent the URL to your beautiful model to other sites. A reply that you, and others, might appreciate is Used with permission.
JAN 17, 2006 - 06:46 AM
Hi Fred and All I agree with your friend comments, as for post WWII situations... but this model is supposed to represent a war time situation and I doubt that the Royal Navy, or US Navy sailors (or any Navy, btw) would be painting their crafts before a landing If you google images for LCVP you'll find severall WWII pictures with the crafts dirty and scratched Just my two cents Skipper
JAN 17, 2006 - 06:24 PM
I'm in love with what I see here, its absolutely stunning. But I'd also have to agree with what WG said to a certain degree. I was a boatswainmate second class and plenty of time coming through the ranks chipping paint, In the navy, there is no day off, specially if your at sea, they keep you very busy to cut down on the bordem and the squabling of the personel. People are actually assigned to these crafts and that's their all day function to clean and maintain them in between standing watch and praying for sleep. I was on the captain's gig and admiral's barge also attached to a motor whale boat team rescue team and every day our stations were inspected. If the boats weren't kept up, we didn't get liberty. But ya, they do get banged up really fast, they rub up against the piers, up against those boat stops along side the ship, ( over 20 years ago I forgot what they were called). Sometimes we'd anchor out and have to take mike boats in for liberty call. That didn't always go well with a full belly of alcohol on the way back. Some of the guys got pretty sick The one thing that I would say that I might have done a little different would be to make it more sun bleached, so it would be a lighter gray. By no means does should my opinion distract you from the fact that what you've done here is absolutely outstanding. If I could afford it I'd buy it from you in a heart beat. Can't wait to see what you have next. Thanks for sharing. I think we ALL thank you for sharing this one
JAN 17, 2006 - 07:15 PM
Hi friends, thank's again for your compliments....I enjoy... and to Fred thank's for WG reply you submitted. About it I want to tell that I know LCVP boats were wood bodies. Infact I tryed to limit rust effect, confining it to bow ramp and around other metal parts, such as bolts or rivets and the shields on both hull-sides. Sorry If I exaggerated with it !!! About navy painting.... I agreed with Skipper: in web I found many pictures of scarped and dirty LCVP, taken just before landing. In my gallery you can see 4 of them, one colors, (cause I forgot URL...), I was inspired by. Thank's all again...and excuse me for my english mistakes!! Tom
JAN 17, 2006 - 07:45 PM
I'm in love with what I see here, its absolutely stunning. But I'd also have to agree with what WG said to a certain degree. I was a boatswainmate second class and plenty of time coming through the ranks chipping paint, In the navy, there is no day off, specially if your at sea, they keep you very busy to cut down on the bordem and the squabling of the personel. People are actually assigned to these crafts and that's their all day function to clean and maintain them in between standing watch and praying for sleep. I was on the captain's gig and admiral's barge also attached to a motor whale boat team rescue team and every day our stations were inspected. If the boats weren't kept up, we didn't get liberty. But ya, they do get banged up really fast, they rub up against the piers, up against those boat stops along side the ship, ( over 20 years ago I forgot what they were called). Sometimes we'd anchor out and have to take mike boats in for liberty call. That didn't always go well with a full belly of alcohol on the way back. Some of the guys got pretty sick The one thing that I would say that I might have done a little different would be to make it more sun bleached, so it would be a lighter gray. By no means does should my opinion distract you from the fact that what you've done here is absolutely outstanding. If I could afford it I'd buy it from you in a heart beat. Can't wait to see what you have next. Thanks for sharing. I think we ALL thank you for sharing this one [/quote] Hi Fred Yes I know the drill I was also aboard two ships, and during a mission of SAR (Serach And Rescue) in the Azores Islands for 4 months we got pretty "leisure time" (read: painting). That's why I have made my comment, because when on NATO exercises (the longer took three weeks in the "pound") we never got any "leisure time" - combat stations, regular quarters, and other exercises took all the time we got - so the looks of the ship got it toll... That's why I said that during WWII i doubt that any ship commander decided that he must have the most pristine looking ship/boats/landing crafts in the fleet Skipper
JAN 17, 2006 - 08:32 PM
Ok, that's it. I want one! Kenny
JAN 18, 2006 - 06:27 AM