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General Ship Modeling
Discuss modeling techniques, experiences, and ship modeling in general.
Hosted by Todd Michalak
FEATURE
Wet Your Ships!
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 - 11:03 PM UTC
Hi all!

Although not the only way to make small water seascapes, here''s a tutorial on how I do it.
Hope that this may help you on future projects.
Enjoy,
Skipper

Link to Item

If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
Gunny
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: July 13, 2004
KitMaker: 6,705 posts
Armorama: 713 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 03:36 AM UTC
Aha, my friend,
I have been waiting for this! Thanks for the great SBS Rui, masterfully done, for sure!
Das Pronto, am I correct in thinking that this would be the equivalent to Celluclay, skip?
~Gunny
#027
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Louisiana, United States
Joined: April 13, 2005
KitMaker: 5,420 posts
Armorama: 25 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 05:10 AM UTC
Awesome SBS Skipper. You make it look so simple, even a cajun could do it.

I too want to know the equivalent to Das Pronto.
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 05:56 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Aha, my friend,
I have been waiting for this! Thanksfor the great SBS Rui, masterfully done, for sure!
Das Pronto, am I correct in thinking that this would be the equivalent to Celluclay, skip?
~Gunny



Hi Mark

I am not sure if it is equivalent to Celluclay... This cames in a vacuum closed package, in the form of a brick, and it has the texture of hard plasticine (without being greasy). Don't know if it has an equivalent in the US...
Perhaps celluclay will do it, as long as it has the same characteristics

Cheers,
Skipper
Gunny
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: July 13, 2004
KitMaker: 6,705 posts
Armorama: 713 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 06:42 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Aha, my friend,
I have been waiting for this! Thanksfor the great SBS Rui, masterfully done, for sure!
Das Pronto, am I correct in thinking that this would be the equivalent to Celluclay, skip?
~Gunny



Hi Mark

I am not sure if it is equivalent to Celluclay... This cames in a vacuum closed package, in the form of a brick, and it has the texture of hard plasticine (without being greasy). Don't know if it has an equivalent in the US...
Perhaps celluclay will do it, as long as it has the same characteristics

Cheers,
Skipper



Upon deeper searching, Celluclay is no way, shape, or form, the same stuff...Das pronto is a premixed air drying modelling clay, while Celluclay is a paper-mache product...looking around at the U.S. products, Crayola ModelMagic clay seems to be the closest alternative if you can't find the real thing...thanks again, Skip!
~Gunny
Halfyank
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Colorado, United States
Joined: February 01, 2003
KitMaker: 5,221 posts
Armorama: 1,245 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 08:49 PM UTC
Great article Skip, thanks.

As to the material used, I don't think that is as critical as how you plan, sculpt, and paint it. Some other materials that are possible to use are caulk, acrylic modeling gel, sparkling compound, and various putties. Skips article does a great job of telling us the steps to do with whatever material we use.

skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Thursday, May 24, 2007 - 09:22 PM UTC
Hi Rodger!

Thanks for the compliments!
I guess you are absolutely right when you say that the important is the way not the medium.. very much in the same way I say that the colour of the water doesn't have to be pure blue, nor always the same!

I think you should give it a try
You'll see it will be easy!

Cheers,
Skipper
jba
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Rhone, France
Joined: November 04, 2005
KitMaker: 1,845 posts
Armorama: 777 posts
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2007 - 12:12 AM UTC
Hi Rui, wow you honor your website with that one, it's both a good diorama and a world class SBS!

Quoted Text

Place the base or hull of the model and play around with it... step back and enjoy, go back and place it differently until you find the right position.



you're just so right there! I do spend more time looking at my WIP than to actually model in order to model clever.


Quoted Text

make your own sea colour.



you're right there too! you know you gave a full account withpics of some boatey model show some 6 months ago, I thought most of the stuff was pretty dull except for *one* great diorama called "green grass" or something with a very hansomely painted boat on a *green* sea.

thanks for sharing tis real good piece of work!
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Friday, May 25, 2007 - 02:47 AM UTC
Allô Jean-Bernard!

Well, I must say that this coming from you, it's an excellent compliment
Most of the times you have to think before you act - and this is just one of those situations, or you can have a bad (or not so good) result!
I am glad that you agree with me on some points

Cheers,
Skipper
Littorio
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 15, 2004
KitMaker: 4,644 posts
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Posted: Friday, May 25, 2007 - 04:22 PM UTC
Thanks Skip,

Great feature, I will use your advice soon as I have a diorama in the planning. South Atlantic 93 years ago

One question for you though, in the dio I will be doing I will have two ships both pushing their engines to the limit, and the larger over taking the smaller. How would you show this speed and get across the dense clouds of coal smoke produced by these ships?

Hope you can offer some advice.

Ciao
Luciano
wildspear
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Michigan, United States
Joined: April 03, 2007
KitMaker: 959 posts
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Posted: Friday, May 25, 2007 - 06:40 PM UTC
Skipper,

Great article. After I get the hang of modeling I may try a Dio with water and it will be your article I'll use as a reference.
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 07:41 PM UTC

Quoted Text


One question for you though, in the dio I will be doing I will have two ships both pushing their engines to the limit, and the larger over taking the smaller. How would you show this speed and get across the dense clouds of coal smoke produced by these ships?

Hope you can offer some advice.

Ciao
Luciano



Ciao Luciano
Glad I could help
About your question:
- to show the difference in the speed, with the bigger subject overtaking the smallest, make the waves produced be the big ship, higher - and you can make the small ship a little bit tilted (perhaps not very real, but you could add a little dramatism). For the smoke... I have seen good results with painted cotton balls, but also have seen terrible results - it's a technique very hard to master, so I always left it off. Also, if you are making one of this smoke clouds, think also in having a display case to prevent the dust to gather there

Cheers,
Skipper
Littorio
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 15, 2004
KitMaker: 4,644 posts
Armorama: 488 posts
Posted: Saturday, May 26, 2007 - 10:23 PM UTC
Thanks Skipper,

I will have a bit of practice with some cotton wool and the airbrush and see what happens.
As for the sizes of ships the larger is the Battlecruiser HMS Invincible doing 25kt while the smaller is the Armoured Cruiser HMS Kent doing 20kt.
Both where going flat out to catch the German Asia squadron.

Ciao
Luciano
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2007 - 04:17 PM UTC
Hi Luciano

Another way of making speed noticed, is the amount of white you put into it.
Check some references, just to check the amount needed
Looking forward to see your future project

Cheers,
Skipper
Littorio
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 15, 2004
KitMaker: 4,644 posts
Armorama: 488 posts
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2007 - 05:28 PM UTC
Thanks Skipper.

When I start I'll let you all know.

Ciao
Luciano
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Sunday, May 27, 2007 - 08:24 PM UTC
Litorio

Another thing on the cotton wool:
Try to tint it first (in a small water container), black or dark grey, let it dry and then use it "thorn" (I am not remembering the apropriate word in english!!!!!) and sparingly... in order to have a feeling of smoke and not a cloud

Just a thought
Skipper
Littorio
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 15, 2004
KitMaker: 4,644 posts
Armorama: 488 posts
Posted: Monday, May 28, 2007 - 04:52 PM UTC
Hi Skipper been having a look around the net a came upon this pic which best shows what I need to try a show.
Although this is HMS Canada but also of WWI vintage.


Ciao
Luciano
wildspear
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Michigan, United States
Joined: April 03, 2007
KitMaker: 959 posts
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Posted: Monday, May 28, 2007 - 08:39 PM UTC
Littorio,

I don't know if it's just my comp but the pic didn't work.
skipper
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Lisboa, Portugal
Joined: February 28, 2002
KitMaker: 5,180 posts
Armorama: 761 posts
Posted: Monday, May 28, 2007 - 10:06 PM UTC

http://www.worldwar1.co.uk/battleship/canada.jpg

Here's a working link

Luciano,
I think that this is "easily" achieved - the worst part will be the rigging
Cheers,
Skipper