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Review
Legend: AVDS 1790 Engine for AFV Club
CMOT
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
ARMORAMA
#406
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2006
KitMaker: 10,629 posts
Armorama: 8,362 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2017 - 06:38 PM UTC


Darren Baker takes a look at the AVDS 1790 Engine for AFV Club M60 family in 1/35th scale from Legend Productions.

Read the Review

If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
metooshelah
#011
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Jerusalem, Israel
Joined: February 06, 2009
KitMaker: 1,505 posts
Armorama: 1,303 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2017 - 09:12 PM UTC
Thank you for reviewing. Will they be following with more (appropriate) interior kits like hull and turret?
thathaway3
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Michigan, United States
Joined: September 10, 2004
KitMaker: 1,558 posts
Armorama: 664 posts
Posted: Monday, March 27, 2017 - 08:25 PM UTC
Beautiful! Now if they'll release the version for the M-88!!
Augster
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California, United States
Joined: November 21, 2012
KitMaker: 5 posts
Armorama: 5 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 12:35 AM UTC
Great review, and thanks for clarifying the difference between the AFV Club version versus the Dragon version as it finalized my decision to use the AFV Club M60 kit when modeling a visible AVDS-1790 pack.

Now, to your comment regarding the engine shroud:


Quoted Text

Another negative comment made relates to the lack of a heat shroud; I have been unable to locate an image of this element, but I believe that if you are going to add an engine to your model of this quality then hiding it again is not going to be your goal.



Whenever we were installing the Deep Water Fording Kit, performing PMCS on the transmission linkages or having our M60A1 packs pulled, we and the mechanics always placed the heat shroud either on top of the back deck (simple PMCS) or, more often (pulling packs), right under the hull as this is the easiest and best place to keep the aluminum shroud from being accidently damaged and trampled on by mechanics, tankers, and the '88 (well, sometimes for height-challenged Marines, the shroud might be illicitly used as a "step" to more easily access the rear engine bay).

Thus, the inclusion of a heat shield in these kits would provide a more accurate depiction of a maintenance scene involving the '1790 pack. Now, if my memory serves me, I believe the heat shroud should be relatively easy to scratch build as essentially it's a flat sheet with a large radius, almost 90-degree bend, with two lift handles, two round openings for the exhaust stacks, and asbestos insulation on the underside.
CMOT
Staff MemberEditor-in-Chief
ARMORAMA
#406
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England - South West, United Kingdom
Joined: May 14, 2006
KitMaker: 10,629 posts
Armorama: 8,362 posts
Posted: Sunday, April 28, 2019 - 03:01 AM UTC
Thank you for adding this information as I am sure it will prove of help.