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135
T-55A

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George used the Tamiya offering of the T-55 in 1/35th scale for this build and the result speaks for itself. The model has been built straight from the box with the addition of Friul metal tracks and copper wire fuel lines. The tank driver is a Dragon Models offering. The model has been painted in what George describes as the black and white technique and then weathered with AK interactive and MIG enamels and pigments.
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About the Author

About George Hartwig (Kybernaughty)
FROM: BAYERN, GERMANY

Like many, I started out as a kid with Airfix and Revell planes. Growing up near the Iron Curtain at the height of the Cold War meant that German and US AFVs were a regular sight in my hometown. Drawn to tanks, I soon splashed out on Tamiya and Italeri AFV kits...... many, many years later... I re...


Comments

Good looking T-55 George.
FEB 08, 2017 - 04:22 PM
Now there's a good-looking beast! Nice weathering and road-grime.
FEB 09, 2017 - 08:31 AM
Hi, Beautifully weathered. More please. All the best, Kip.
FEB 11, 2017 - 06:35 AM
Explain your 'black and white' method, please!!
FEB 11, 2017 - 05:54 PM
Dear all,
FEB 12, 2017 - 08:07 PM
thank you very much for the encouragement I've received here! After all it's been my first project to be displayed here on Armorama. So, "black and white technique" actually refers to the technique described in Jose Luiz Lopez' book "Painting guide for AFV" (Pub. Histoire et Collections). It means that the model is shaded and weathered in black and white, or rather greys, first. The idea is to simulate lighting effects (i.e. azimutal lighting) and also chipping & grime effects BEFORE applying any other color. So, you have a monochrome version of your tank first, and then you apply the final color much like a filter, highly diluted so that your pre-shading will still be visible. I think Mig Jiminenez' "Transparator" - product achieves something similar. Well, I'd read a lot about his technique and just wanted to try it out.
FEB 12, 2017 - 08:16 PM
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