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Stickframe
#362
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California, United States
Joined: December 01, 2013
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 08:25 AM UTC
Hi guys, time for a new project.

*Sroll down for pics* despite slow load time, they eventually did*

So, as noted on my recent F150 update, as a result of the quarantine, this guy finds himself - quarantined....along with the majority of his neighbors. So, sitting here, and having finished various important tasks, like checking on family and friends, making sure there's some food in the place, fretting, cleaning the kitchen, watching the tv - the guy needs something to do...real work has ground to a halt - meetings postponed etc...so, as this guy has a stash, time to try something different and F1 seems to be just that.

A while ago, I started collecting F1 kits that look cool - generally late 70's to the present, specifically those with engines included. I learned a few things,primarily that F1 doesn't seem to have much to offer in 1/24, tho there are some, there are plenty of 1/20 kits, and details available, and several 1/12 kits. And as this guy does, he waited for sales and apparent bargains - these are not obvious.

You need to root around advertised "sales" and if something interesting pops up, buy it. Your experience might be different, but this process has worked out fine for me, tho I know next to nothing about the various kits I've acquired (not about the mfg, but about vehicle history).

In any event, here we go - first up, a 1/24 Hasegawa, Zakspeed Yamaha ZX891. Of course, it turns out this is widely celebrated as an unsuccessful car - a dog. Oh well, the guy builds what the guy has. It cost about $20 USD.

The kit is nothing to write home about,though it could have been. The plastic composition is a bit weird, and in many cases the guy is required to drill out or enlarge locating points...perfect - next, some details are soft, and the assembly sequence is a bit off - the engine for example. It does not go together in a clean and tidy way, and instead, leaves parts "floating" during assembly...

All of that said, I looked the car up on Google, found a few pics, and off we go.

Well, not yet, as the server won't upload photos again. Again, as the guy has time on his hands, well, there you go - he waits...

Hopefully you all are doing well wherever you may be - people are taking this seriously here, which is good. In this case, a lot better to be safe than sorry. My parents are older, so I'm calling rather than visiting, and thankfully, they are laying low - doing odds and ends around the house, rather than travelling about. They can hole up there for quite a while. Their community has been subject to severe wildfires in the last few years, and losing power frequently - as such, they recently had to restock the freezer etc - so, they are good to go for a while.

Still getting the server busy note...so, not pics yet. I suppose I'm not the only quarantined guy, trying to post, or use the Inet in general. Thankfully, about a month ago i subscribed to a new really fast service - that's good. Well,I might be out of luck, waiting or not - I just can't get into the gallery....that said, this guy does have time....

Well, this guy has lunch to make and models to work on. He'll tr again later - for now, just imagine a not bad, but not great F1 engine, with new velocity stacks, aluminum manifold tops and stack holder, fuel rack, and some wiring, which looks ok.

Stay safe gents - will try to post again later.

Cheers,

Nick






















Well, this guy lucked out - and was able to post some pics!

Stay well guys -

Cheers
Nick






justsendit
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 08:59 AM UTC
Hey Nick!
I know nothing about F1 other than “this guy” will make that kit look awesome!😂 Already diggin’ the aluminum stacks!

Here’s hoping that you and your family stay well.

Cheers!🍺
—mike
Joel_W
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 09:18 AM UTC
Nick,
Always nice to see another F1 build, so I'll be following along.

As for the real car, both Zakspeed Yamaha weren't very successful in the world of F1, and this was Zakspeed's last effort before leaving F1. Basically the same for Yamaha's power plants.

For F1, I only build 1/20 scale models, so I've no 1st hand knowledge of the Hasegawa kits other then from your descriptions and pictures.

You scratch building has changed that horrid molded intake trumpet assembly into one that looks so much better. Did you turn those intake trumpets yourself, or buy them?

As for the copper wire for ignition wires, I've never seen that before, but it does work nicely. Same for the shift linkage improvements.

Looking forward to your next update, and knowing the speed at which you build, it will be sooner then later.

Again, well home.

Joel
Cosimodo
#335
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 11:51 AM UTC
Great start Nick. I like the way you rivetted the base for the trumpets. You always have that eye for detail.

cheers
Michael
AussieReg
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 01:07 PM UTC
Waving your usual magic detailing wand over an F1, excellent! I'm no F1 expert, but definitely appreciate the work going in here and the improvement over the kit. I have a 1/24 Hasegawa Ferrari F189 High Induction kit in the stash, it will be interesting to see how that one stacks up quality-wise against your kit here.

I'm sure the updates will come thick and fast (well, as fast as the upload will handle) with you being home-bound at the moment.

Cheers, D
Dixon66
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Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 11:58 PM UTC
At the speed Nick builds, we can expect an entire auto museum each month. LOL
Szmann
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Posted: Friday, March 20, 2020 - 02:37 PM UTC
Nick, thanks for the very entertaining and inspiring update. I'm all eyes!

Gabriel
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Posted: Friday, March 20, 2020 - 10:06 PM UTC
Amazing detail Work Nick. Almost a shame to paint that beautiful copper
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 12:13 PM UTC
Hello gents,

Thanks for dropping by -

Yes, no doubt like many of you, this guy is still home quarantined - I've joked via text with guy that owns my neighborhood bar that he should open a speakeasy - mask and gloves required for entry. In the meantime, limited social interaction, and time to do other stuff, like building models. It's raining out, so only indoor photos for now, as the Zakspeed is done.

Mike, long time no talk, yep, this guy is still building, and I'm guessing you are too! I've stepped out of (my) armor for a while, haha - thanks for stopping by.

Hi Joel, yes, this car, as it turns out, is widely recognized to have been as failure, which is too bad, it sure looks nice! As for the trumpets, straight from the junkbox - I thought I'd use them for something else. I don't have any machining tools, except some files, cutters, pin vices, an etch bender, and time! I saw a blog about a guy remilling a Ferrari engine in his garage!! Milling, welding cylinder walls and ports - unbelievable! really inspired me to do something a bit more adventurous!

Michael! I'm glad you noticed the rivets!! I think bolt heads would have been better, but I simply don't have tiny metal bolt "blanks" on hand - the shaft on the rivets is .5 mm in diameter - good enough for this!

Hi Damian, I can't say this kit is a complete dog, but it's not great - at all. Better luck with yours! The most recent feature has been parts snapping off with random predictability!! I don't think I've ever had to drill and pin so many parts on a kit - - alas, as I have time, why not??

Hi David, well, one down! and more to go - It seems I'll be stuck here at the home office for a while, as many work projects have ground to a halt....I had one call today, discussing how we'll try and crank up again in a couple of weeks. I'm involved with land planning and development, and while the big concern is the health risk, the "other" big concern is what's happened to the market in the last two weeks, and what might eventually happen. For now model building.

Hi Gabriel, glad this is proving interesting. While not as bad as your Ferrari to build, this has featured an abundance of tedious problems. That said, it's a $20 kit....not a Fujimi or Tamiya - it has reminded me of how good they are though!

Hi Jesper, You know, I've thought that myself from time to time. Once the paint and body goes on, a lot of that detail and nice visual character is lost. As you'll see below, with paint - the wires "disappear" -

Ok, on with some photos - sadly, only from indoors, but even then, you'll see this turned out pretty well. You'll also see - photo proof, that primer color makes a difference. My plan was to paint all of this red, then add white body color decals. Unhappily most of the body color decals were wrecked, so, I decided to paint those on. Still good, a bit of bleeding, but not much. Except, for the main body I used pink primer, while for the rear cowl, I used, grey...and lets see what happened:



OK, of course the server is slow again..I'll be here for a half an hour posting! alas, the guy still has time on his hands...perfect...and still waiting for the server...after a long wait- I'm going for a speed post of the Zakspeed:















In spite of being a mediocre kit, and my (successful) attempts to screw up the paint, not a bad first F1 kit for me! If this were a better kit, or one that I had some enthusiasm about, I could have reworked the paint on the cowl - nah, it's done.

I am pleased with the engine, the bit of unfinished metal, added detail, combined with a generous mix of variations in black paint, give it a better than the kit is look. The seat belts are really old from Eduard - Sparco I think. They give the kit the "finished look". As for the wheels - those of you who have seen my F150 will recognize that nice copper color - not at all authentic, I just like it. Of course, I've since changed that color out of the F150 - lol

So one down.

Next up, a Fujimi, 1/20 scale Ferrari 126 C2, with the bonus feature of an "FMD" detail kit. I've never heard of FMD, but found this kit with all sorts of etch, white metal and resin on sale, at what looked like a really low price, which led me to finding the Ferrari kt. In total, the cost was about $120. So, on we go - First up, some of the lower body/chassis/monocoque:



The lower body is boxy, with a facade of nicely detailed photoetch. This applique will stay unpainted. In this strange photo, you can see both exterior (foreground) and interior conditions. I show this because inevitably, when I attach big sheets of etch to plastic, I will at some point, accidentally "flick it" off. So, to combat that problem, I did three things:

1) rough up the inside of the etch with a file and sand paper - creating as coarse a surface as I can;

2) rough up the surface of the plastic which the etch will be glued to with a steel brush; and,

3) you can see on the far side of the photo, a large portion of the exterior facing etch hangs below the body plastic, where I added several lead foil "tabs" glued to both the plastic and inside of the etch.

This might seem like a bit much, but there's few things that annoy this guy more than accidentally flicking the etch off the car, once the body is painted!!! Think about the rear etch fins on 917k's and GT40 MK Iv's - I managed to "flick" these off on both kits!!



The kit came with a one piece front wing, and multi piece for the rear. They look fine. But, the FMD kit comes with the opportunity to use etch AND white metal for both! woohoo. For the nose wing, the central section of the plastic part needs for be carved out, then, two pairs of holes need to be drilled into the sides of the nose, to receive the wings and some etch. Of course, the instructions don't mention this "little" step in the process, so this guy was being challenged.

As for the rear wing assembly, all FMD stuff, vague instructions, oh, and me needing to tediously drill 8 small holes (only needed three bits!!) through the two layers of etch on each side, then drilling matching holes in the white metal wings...and finally, inserting and gluing 8 metal pins to hold it all together. Oh, except for the top wing, which is, well, eyeballed and glued. Piece of cake....





Within the actual monocoque, there is an ample supply of details and opportunity to use more of the thin wire. So I did. Believe it or, not, there is more wire to add, but I'll do that after paint.

As I seem to be tackling one tedious project after another, I thought, "hey - lets assemble the white metal wheels - how hard can that be?" well, read on:



Yeah, so the plastic kit wheels (right) and nice rubber tires are wider than the multi part, fancy pants white metal wheels (left)...perfect



As is often the case, Evergreen to the rescue! Flat for the front wheels, on end for the rear, and how to install it:





Above, you can see "just" curve the plastic to match the rim, and keep it curving to match the radius, and glue it down. As with the etch body parts, I really don't want these to flick off, so back to adding metal pins. This was easier said than done. The rim wall are thin - so, I drilled #78 pilot holes, followed by #72 holes, for metal rods. Good times. This followed by cleaning up the edge to the extent practical, and filling any gaps.





As seen above, the results are pretty good.

Next steps - I haven't decided - Maybe prime and paint the monocoque upper and lower halves? It will also receive a ONE piece etch facade - over the entire thing! This guy is nervous about that simple task...It needs to be done though, as most of the Fujimi front suspension will be replaced by FMD etch and white metal. The brackets for the new suspension, will be attached to the etch monocoque shell.

As this is not quite as anxiety inducing as an MFH kit, it is giving me a run for a lot less money. I'm hoping this process will sharpen my skills so I can eventually try another MFH kit!

Stay well model guys -

Cheers

Nick

AussieReg
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#007
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Victoria, Australia
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Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2020 - 12:48 PM UTC
When you're on a roll, just keep rollin' on!

Excellent updates and some very nice work on chapter 2 already Nick.

Cheers, D
Cosimodo
#335
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Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2020 - 11:12 AM UTC
Probably shouldn't say it, but I happy that you're stuck at home. Learning a lot from the way you deal with issues. Great solution for the wheels.

Oh, and the Zakspeed looks pretty good too!

cheers
Michael
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 07:57 AM UTC
Hi guys,

Yes, D and Michael, still sitting at home. I'm in the thick of the Ferrari, which is turning out to be a fun build. Michael, glad this stuff is useful for you. I've found multi-media conversions require a fair amount of on the fly problem solving. The instructions are usually vague and the assembly not that straight forward. I'll try and post some pics of the Ferrari engine. It's hard to believe how big 1/20 parts are - I didn't think they would be that much bigger than 1/24.

But, it was sunny this morning, and as I'm still stuck at home, so outside this guy went for some fresh air and pictures of the Zakspeed! It sure looks fast













And there you have it. My blunder with the primer is obvious enough, but as a whole, I think it looks pretty nice!

Stay well gents -

Nick

AussieReg
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#007
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Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2020 - 10:47 AM UTC

Quoted Text

And there you have it. My blunder with the primer is obvious enough, but as a whole, I think it looks pretty nice!



Nick, you are spot on, it does indeed look pretty nice! In the sunlight the primer differences are highlighted, and a very good lesson for us all!

Cheers, D
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Saturday, March 28, 2020 - 01:35 PM UTC
Hello gents,

Sitting at home, as many of us are...in an effort to overcome social abstinence, this guy is still building. Damian, glad you like it - and, yes, I conclusively proved, the color of primer will and does change the base color. The good news is this discovery occurred on a $20 kit, not a fancy one.

Speaking of fancier kits, this guy is still working on the Ferrari, and with time and relatively few distractions headway is being made. As a reminder, this is a Fujimi kit with an "FMD" conversion kit. I've never heard of FMD. Although the conversion instructions are pretty weak, the parts are generally pretty good.

All of that said, armed with a few pics of the real car, I was able to spot some changes I could make and as time is on my side, why not?

Again, as time is on my side, I took some progress photos. First up, there are at least three opportunities to change Fujimi parts, and make some parts not provided by the kit or conversion. I built a little deck and flashing for the pieces that will eventually hold the air intake mesh, using thin aluminum. This wasn't that straight forward, but it worked, and I didn't think to take any pics.

I did though take some pics of the process of making a bracket for holding the tailpipes. I discovered this bracket looking at Inet images. First up, making a pattern for drilling - you can also see the first attempt that sat too low:





This guy uses some pretty high tech tools...after drilling the holes with a pin vise, clamp the sheet of aluminum into an etch bender and ream out with triangle files....Hmmm, a guy could use, larger diameter drill bits.... nah....



Then, start cutting and add some lightening holes - just like from the factory! you can see the first try, which left the pipes sitting too low, in my opinion.



Above, you can see one of the white metal pipes, drilled out, and with some tedious photoetch added. In addition to looking pretty cool, I think this bracket is necessary - as, when a guy is building, he can EASILY knock free hanging/weakly connected parts askew or altogether off - something I considered after having proven this on a variety of projects in the past.



Next up, home made channel, using thin sheet brass. I have a small North West Short Line metal bender - making a first, clean 90 degree bend. Then into the little etch holder, and begin gradually bending reciprocal 90 degree folds making a channel. This is slow going. The purpose for making these channels is to mount them to the inner body, where they will serve as a wiring race, running from near mid cockpit, back to the engine. I now have two of them that are reasonably similar to one another:



While the FMD details are pretty good, they are missing a few little details, like two holes, needed in what sure seems to be stainless steel etch - or something else that is really hard!! forget drilling it with standard bits, which if you try: 1) get very dull very quickly; and, 2) snap. I have since ordered some cobalt #72 bits. In the meantime, I used this method:



1) punch a hole into your fingers and draw blood as a sacrifice to the model building gods; 2) use a hard, sharp tool to set a dimple into the metal.





Once you've made a big dimple in the metal, start filing, until a hole appears. This process is slow going, in that the material is obviously tough, but, it will also be visible when done, so you don't want to accidentally kink it. Once the hole is made, progressively ream it until is gets fairly large in diameter, going from a #72 bit size, up to about 1/8" in diameter. I used a rat tail file to go from the tiny hole to the desired diameter. I know, it sounds easy enough - It isn't. It does work:



Next up, matching holes added to the car body:



Comparatively easy drilling here, except, the guy needed to remember - there are parts inside the body shell too - so don't drill them too!! While not that hard to do, the clearances are tight.

Next, well, the FMD conversion requires you to cut off or not use Fujimi suspension parts, and replace them with etch and whie metal parts! cool! Less cool....well, the suspension brackets that hold the suspension arms seem to be glued to the etch body sheathing, and the plastic body. Experience says again:

"If you were a thinking guy, you'd figure out how to make a stable gluing point for the suspension parts, or, you will certainly break them off at least twice during the rest of the build..."

So, I added a little structural bridge, across the lower part of the cabin, to rest the suspension parts on. Another fun note, you can not install the arms, until the two halves of the cabin are glues together, and the sheet metal sheathing - attached and glued in place. It would have been good to have the instructions tell a guy this, nah...better to "learn by doing", the motto of my university:



And, to the lower right, are the control arms that will eventually sit on this bridge.

And, the engine, lot of good fun. The parts are really pretty nice, with an OK fit. Nonetheless, many of the parts are drilled, pinned and glued, you know why. Lots of other holes need to be glued for ignition wires, fuel lines and so on.















It's since been primed for paint. Sorry about so many pics, but, again...this guy has some time on his hands...

Before I paint and detail the engine, I'll get back to the cabin area, which needs paint, assembly, the sheathing, and then, the suspension!

OK folks, stay safe and well!

Nick




Joel_W
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Posted: Sunday, March 29, 2020 - 10:35 AM UTC
Nick,
Talk about one very long post. At my age I forgot what the 1st part of the post was about, so I had to go back and re-read it, then I forgot a lot of what you covered in the 2nd part, so back to re-reading it as well

I'm more then just impressed with how your Zakspeed/Yamaha F1 turned out. While the car looked fast in real life, the Yamaha engine was a dog in every sense of the word, including finding ways to continuously break down. Poor old Zakspeed went back to Sports cars as a team owner, not a driver.

I'm more then impressed on how you literally took a plain Jane kit that I've passed over time and time again, and turned it into a nicely detailed display model.

Even with being home nearly 24/7 I still can't figure out how you manage to build, detail, and scratch build at warp speed.

I'm looking forward to following your adventures with the Fujimi 1/20 scale Ferrari 126 C2. Once you get use to the scale, you'll love it. All my open wheel builds are 1/20 scale.

For starters, I'm surprised that the detail kit manufacture would include such grossly under sized wheels, but you solved that problem in a most unique manner. The finished wheels look great.

The rear wing really came out quite nice, as did the flat 6 turbo charged engine. Not one of Mr. Ferrari's prettier units. Especially when one considers that the engine/transaxle was what he most cared most about in all of his race cars.

While I'm basically a OOB/enhance type of guy, and prefer working with plastic over metal, I do marvel at how you go about fashioning those parts. I did have to laugh when I saw your blood from a slight miss. And here I thought that I was the king of cutting and stabbing myself. Not many guys keep Band-Aids in one of my tool drawers.

As usual, I'm looking forward to your next update, and most likely the finished pictures of your build soon after that.

Joel
jimb
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Posted: Sunday, March 29, 2020 - 10:58 AM UTC
These are some great looking F1 cars. The detailing is top notch. Very well done.

Jim
Cosimodo
#335
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Posted: Monday, March 30, 2020 - 01:24 PM UTC
As always some great additions there Nick! Looking forward to seeing the engine installed.

cheers
Michael
Szmann
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Posted: Monday, March 30, 2020 - 03:48 PM UTC
Nick, are you even human?
These are scratch building super-powers! An you are building fast too. You put me to shame - I'm still yapping after my fight with the Porsche engine
Brilliant and inspirational work! Thank you for taking the time to make pictures and share them!

Gabriel
Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2020 - 09:09 AM UTC
Hello fellow model builders,

As I suppose like many of you, this guy is still staying at home. Work - - is slow. As with us, many clients are also waiting it out, so, time to build stuff.

Hi Joel, glad you like the results with the Zakspeed Yamaha. Maybe like the real car, the kit isn't great, or should I say is somewhat unconventional. Some of the assembly steps and connections are questionable, and the plastic prone to snapping. The scratch built add on details were actually more predictable!

For the current project, I agree, the Ferrari probably isn't their most beautiful effort; that said, the basis for this overall project was to use relatively inexpensive kits, purchased on the cheap, with the understanding that each has some cool features, in this case, the snappy photo etch and white metal odds and ends. I found the detail kit on sale before I found the kit itself.

Ha - you are not alone regarding bandages, as I too keep a box handy - I frequently cut myself by: 1) using the razor saw cutting really short lengths of tubing, which I do a lot; 2) drilling holes; 3) rarely (thankfully!!) with the Xacto; and, 4) more rarely, as shown above, by sharp edges of photo etch. In most cases, this guy's right index finger is the recipient of said injuries.

Jim, Michael and Gabriel, glad you guys like the progress. As far as speed of process goes, I've thought about this. I worked for a giant company for a long time (23 years). When I started I was a really ambitious designer and hustled all the time. I eventually became a studio leader, but over time, this role meant a lot more administrative duty, which while important, was not that interesting or rewarding - at all, and was in no way creative. I enjoy designing a lot more than early morning phone calls to discuss backlog and utilization, dealing with HR issues, and weekly project reporting. Model building is an opportunity for this guy to do something creative and it's fun.

Ok - enough rambling, you guys get the point, and can probably share some "magic" of your own from the workplace! Here, we go.

Below you'll see the cabin of the car, and you'll see how many of the oddball projects/tasks done earlier got used:





The etch sheathing on this car is what caught my eye to begin with - and I still think it looks cool! You can now also better understand my awkward description of the build process. The basic tub is plastic, that you need to cover in etch before you can add some, but not all details. Of course some details need to be added first, but the "fantastic" instructions give you no indication as to which is which, in regard to process or steps...nice...!

Well fellas, looks like you're in for the treat of this guy rambling again, as the server is getting busy again - nice.

Well, when the server works again, you'll see an aerial view of the left front. Take a look at the red and black wires. You'll see my home made brass channel, serving as a "race" or, housing for wires, and you'll see the wires plugging into the body through the hole drilled into the etch, just behind the upper control arm.

Ah, yes, the control arms - you can also see how they too are "plugged" into the race car body. You might remember this guy describing a "bridge" built across the lower hull, to support said brackets. The arms are now resting on the bridge. I wonder how long these would actually stay attached if you followed the (lack) of instructions? My bet - not too long, and well, this guy knows he'd surely knock them off if they didn't eventually fall off.

I will say though, the "U" brackets holding the forward control linkages worked really well. I note this because of having a long string of failures trying the same with etch at 1/35 scale, an ugly and frustrating process!! I'm still looking for really small eye bolts so I can build the linkages myself. I know these bits are out there, this guy just can't find them!

Well sheesh....the server is still busy. This guy wants to get some lunch. Enough rambling! I'll come back, "closed for lunch"







The server busy...and the server busy...and, the server busy...







And, now to something dull - please note the two 1.4mm screws, set into the lower body section. This holds the car together. I learned this trick in one of my recent attempts at an MFH build. This is a really good idea when it comes to keeping these kits tight. With no positive connections, screws or otherwise, heavy things, pressed together tightly, tend to pop apart..that's a treat. Yeah, more from the ol' experience well...



OK gents, stay well

Nick



Stickframe
#362
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Posted: Wednesday, April 01, 2020 - 01:10 PM UTC
Hello model builders,

As it is sunny outside, time to take some pics! in my last post you saw the car body, but here, you'll get a better view of the etch body:









I haven't ever worked on a finish like this, but this guy likes it! well worth the effort.

Next - the engine, also outside with some paint. The only downside to these photos is it's so bright, you can't see much of the variation in silver/metal finishes - take a look:











And there it is. Yes, I see a few areas that need a touch up. This still has a way to go. I've since screwed these key pictures together per my last post, adding two 1.2mm screws. IN addition to keeping things put, this has helped to get the body to sit reasonably flush!! that never happens for me, so it should stay flush, even with paint - haha - I doubt it will.

Before that, I need to build the rear suspension and attach the rear and nose wings.

Stay well guys -

Nick
Szmann
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Netherlands Antilles
Joined: September 02, 2014
KitMaker: 1,875 posts
Armorama: 305 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 01, 2020 - 01:43 PM UTC
Certainly beyond my modelling reach
Very impressive!

I know, I'm repeating myself, but I have too, because I'm lost for words

Gabriel
rv1963
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New York, United States
Joined: December 07, 2004
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Posted: Wednesday, April 01, 2020 - 01:49 PM UTC
Yeh that is some amazing detail work, i will be watching this build.
Stickframe
#362
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California, United States
Joined: December 01, 2013
KitMaker: 1,575 posts
Armorama: 1,201 posts
Posted: Saturday, April 04, 2020 - 06:13 AM UTC
Hi Gabriel and Robert,

Thanks for dropping by - this guy was going to paint the body parts today, but likely not now - it's raining. The relative humidity seems to not agree with Tamiya rattle can primer. I've tried, and inevitably get random, small groupings bubble/dots of popping out above the rest of the smooth primmer surface. I've tried to sand these down, but that often results in little dimples on the surface, that while apparently tiny, clearly JUMP OUT with base and clear coat. So, for today, no paint.

I have a few odds and ends to add to the engine, and need to finish the driver area. It's too bad, with all the various goodies I've added to this, the seat walls and cockpit looks pretty barren. The shifter and linkage, and seat belts will help, but compared to other areas of the build, this looks pretty simple. Who knows, maybe a reason to look at more pictures and see what I can add?

Stay well gents -

Cheers
Nick
Stickframe
#362
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California, United States
Joined: December 01, 2013
KitMaker: 1,575 posts
Armorama: 1,201 posts
Posted: Monday, April 06, 2020 - 07:58 AM UTC
Hello guys,

Still moving along with the Ferrari 126 C2. This has been quite a build, in that it includes such a variety of material, many of which are left exposed as raw metal. I like the results. As always, pictures..."expose" all of the long list of painting flaws, scrapes, tiny blobs of CA, and so on. The only upside is that most are fairly small and relatively hard to see in real life, while a few others NEED to be fixed.

I still can't paint the body, as it's still raining - I've learned my lesson - relative humidity is not great for Tamiya spray primer. As like I'm sure many of you, this guy is still stuck at home, so, time is on my side.

On to some pics. In another post with Joel, we were talking about the challenge of getting wheels and suspensions set up to sit level on all four, and to have all four pointing in the same direction. To my happy surprise, it worked this time, and believe me, this car sits low!



You can hardly tell this car isn't slammed to the ground, but, it isn't as you can see above. In retrospect, I'm really glad I built in the front suspension "bridge" - which keeps the upper control arms attached and level.

And some general images:









Yes, the body will be removable! Looking at the pics above, you can see how the variety of kit, trans kit, and scratch parts go together. The roll/stabilizer bars use metal rods, drilled into plastic kit parts, so they are relatively strong, don't have the annoying micro-seam lines that are in the plastic parts, and I could slightly bend them for a snug fit without breaking them.









So, most of the chassis, engine, etc is done. I still need to add some decal, touch up some paint and so on.

As I wait for the rain to pass, I'll get going on the GTR for the GB.

This guy is still trying to do real work from home, but that's moving at a slow pace. I wrote a proposal on Friday, and plan to send it out today or tomorrow - fingers crossed!

Stay well -

Cheers
Nick
AussieReg
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
AUTOMODELER
#007
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Victoria, Australia
Joined: June 09, 2009
KitMaker: 7,529 posts
Armorama: 181 posts
Posted: Monday, April 06, 2020 - 11:28 AM UTC
This is seriously next-level stuff Nick, it looks amazing! I fully expect to see you fuel it up and take it for a few laps of the back yard soon.

Keep the updates coming, and stay bunkered down!

Cheers, D