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World War II
Discuss WWII and the era directly before and after the war from 1935-1949.
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Review
Tamiya: Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I
SgtRam
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AEROSCALE
#197
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Posted: Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 06:02 AM UTC


The newly tooled Tamiya Spitfire Mk.I is out and here William Wilgus takes a look in the box.

Read the Review

If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
bill_c
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MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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Posted: Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 07:05 AM UTC
Super review. I read it even though it's about quarter scale since the I is the version we long for in 1/32nd scale and hope the research that went into this kit will be scaled up to the larger size. The Tamiya Spitfire was the first of their "super detailed" kits in 32-scale, and since then those of us who build them have pretty much left Hasegawa behind (only Wingnut Wings can compare). So here's vote 4,385,215 for a 32-scale Battle of Britain Spitty.
WIggus
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Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 01:53 AM UTC
Thanks Bill.

I would bet that Las Vegas takes bets on what 1/32 kit Tamiya will release next. Everyone has a wish...and a guess. :-)
Bellerophon
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Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 03:35 AM UTC
My theory to explain the decal sheet: The center dot of the roundel exaggerates registration error: the white ring becomes broader on one side at the expense of the other, and the eye compares the two. However, the same registration error wouldn't be noticeable for the tail flash - it would just mean the white stripe is a tiny bit too wide or narrow, or the red stripe is too high or low by that amount. So it's a good decision by Tamiya.
WIggus
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Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 04:28 AM UTC
I like your theory, Ed. It has to be a printing consideration, and you're right that bad registration would be easy to notice in the bullseye.

I work for a commercial offset printer and that degree of registration error would be hard to achieve. BUT, we are not printing on decal stock. I'm sure that is a whole 'nother set of rules and parameters. They may even be run on a flexographic press?

Thanks.
M4A1Sherman
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Posted: Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 04:05 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Super review. I read it even though it's about quarter scale since the I is the version we long for in 1/32nd scale and hope the research that went into this kit will be scaled up to the larger size. The Tamiya Spitfire was the first of their "super detailed" kits in 32-scale, and since then those of us who build them have pretty much left Hasegawa behind (only Wingnut Wings can compare). So here's vote 4,385,215 for a 32-scale Battle of Britain Spitty.



Hi Bill, and Everyone else!

Though 1/32-scale is the growing trend right now, there are still a vast number of guys such as myself, who are 1/4-scalers. The 1/72-scalers' numbers are even greater than the 1/4-scalers'. REVELL made a 1/32 Mk.I/Mk.II way back in the mid 1960s, but we can hardly expect this venerable kit to keep pace with the beautiful 1/32 aircraft kits we are seeing today. My expectations are that TAMIYA will soon follow suit with a 1/32 Mk.I, AND an all-new Mk.V, in order to keep you 32-scalers happy!


This new TAMIYA 1/48 Spitfire Mk.I is JUST what the doctor ordered, even though the "NEW" AIRFIX kit of same is no slouch. I've looked BOTH kits over virtually part for part. I say "virtually" because TAMIYA has come up with several novel features which are completely different from the norm. These are, to name a few, the separate halves for the Inner/Outer Cockpit area of the Fuselage, the single-piece Upper Engine Cowling, and the Landing Gear Strut Assembly. My opinion is that this particular Mk.I is THE BEST Spitfire Mk.I that money can buy. The beautiful Cockpit assemblies negate something along the lines of EDUARD's BRASSIN' or BIG SIN multi-media Cockpits for the people who don't want to bother with the "extra work", but I would be more than willing to see if EDUARD will indeed go that far. EDUARD has already released several BRASSIN' "updates" for this kit, of which I will likely buy very soon...

I cannot speak for the 1/48 EDUARD Spitfires, because they don't make a Mk.I... Yet... Give 'em time... I will not compare EDUARD's Mk.Vs, Mk.VIIIs, Mk.IXs, etc to TAMIYA's Mk.I, just because they were/are so different. This would be akin to comparing a P-51 or a P-51A to a late war P-51D...

As to the TAMIYA 1/48 Mk.I's parts, the two different Cockpit Doors alone, hint that there is a new Mk.V in the works. It WOULD make perfect sense for TAMIYA to do so. I've checked the other on-line modeling sites, and the reactions to this new Mk.I have been VERY positive...

The "NEW" AIRFIX 1/48 P-51D is currently THE bench-mark '51 kit. I have to wonder if Mr.T will counter with an all-new tooling Mustang of his own- The TAMIYA 1/32 P-51D is a SUPER kit, so why not a re-tooled '51 in 1/48..? Will they re-tool their three already EXCELLENT P-47 kits..? Or their three Corsairs..? Their Bf.109s and Fw.190s could VERY EASILY stand to be re-tooled...

I LIKE this new TAMIYA Spitfire Mk.I, and I have plans for three of them already...
Kevlar06
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Posted: Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 08:53 AM UTC

Quoted Text



Though 1/32-scale is the growing trend right now, there are still a vast number of guys such as myself, who are 1/4-scalers. The 1/72-scalers' numbers are even greater than the 1/4-scalers'. REVELL made a 1/32 Mk.I/Mk.II way back in the mid 1960s, but we can hardly expect this venerable kit to keep pace with the beautiful 1/32 aircraft kits we are seeing today.......



I’d like to add my “two cents” worth here. Firstly, I want to state I’d be the first in line to buy a new Tamiya Mk1 Kit if and when it comes out. But, before we discount the 1969 release of Revell’s “venerable” 1/32 kit, we need to take a close look at it. It was accurate in shape and outline, had fabric covered flying surfaces with rib detail, and more importantly it had finely ENGRAVED and accurately detailed panel lines. It lacked an accurately detailed cockpit, engine, and landing gear, But, IMHO, it surpassed the current Revell, Hobby Boss, PCM, and other Spifires out there in regards to the outer skin, the exception being Tamiya’s Mk9 of course. So don’t discount this old kit until you take a look at the engraving. Couple the “old” Revell issue with the “guts” of the existing newer kits, and you can get a pretty nice looking Mk1 going.
VR, Russ
M4A1Sherman
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Posted: Thursday, April 18, 2019 - 11:02 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text



Though 1/32-scale is the growing trend right now, there are still a vast number of guys such as myself, who are 1/4-scalers. The 1/72-scalers' numbers are even greater than the 1/4-scalers'. REVELL made a 1/32 Mk.I/Mk.II way back in the mid 1960s, but we can hardly expect this venerable kit to keep pace with the beautiful 1/32 aircraft kits we are seeing today.......



I’d like to add my “two cents” worth here. Firstly, I want to state I’d be the first in line to buy a new Tamiya Mk1 Kit if and when it comes out. But, before we discount the 1969 release of Revell’s “venerable” 1/32 kit, we need to take a close look at it. It was accurate in shape and outline, had fabric covered flying surfaces with rib detail, and more importantly it had finely ENGRAVED and accurately detailed panel lines. It lacked an accurately detailed cockpit, engine, and landing gear, But, IMHO, it surpassed the current Revell, Hobby Boss, PCM, and other Spifires out there in regards to the outer skin, the exception being Tamiya’s Mk9 of course. So don’t discount this old kit until you take a look at the engraving. Couple the “old” Revell issue with the “guts” of the existing newer kits, and you can get a pretty nice looking Mk1 going.
VR, Russ



VR Russ, did I "discount" this "Venerable old kit"? NO. I DID call it "VENERABLE", did I not?"

From Webster's Dictionary: "venerable: 1. worthy of respect or reverence", et al...

I did not DENIGRATE the old REVELL Spitfire Mk.I kit in ANY WAY. I DID say that TODAY's 1/32 kits are "BEAUTIFUL", meaning that they take advantage of today's CAD and SLIDE-MOLDING technologies, which are today's benchmark. I'm SURE that if TAMIYA should deign to produce an all-new 1/32 scale Spitfire Mk.I, that it would be superior to the old REVELL kit, if only by virtue of the aforementioned "today's CAD and SLIDE-MOLDING technologies"... People become "prickly" over my commentary because they don't take the time to actually READ what I'm saying...

If anything, by calling the old REVELL 1/32 Mk.I Spitfire "venerable", I should think that I had already paid this old kit one of the highest compliments due to it...
Kevlar06
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Posted: Friday, April 19, 2019 - 03:57 AM UTC
You've read too much into my comment. I wasn't trying to be "prickly" and I wasn't directing my comment at anyone. I was just saying for modelers in general not to "discount" the older kit just because it's "old", because it still has a lot to offer, and many younger modelers (younger than I am) don't realize the Revell 1/32 Spitfire, Tony, Frank, and Jack were some of the first kits to have beautifully engraved and accurate panel lines-- real mold maker works of art. The Japanese aircraft molds have been lost, making the kits collectors items, but the Spit can still be found-- usually dirt cheap because it's been "replaced" by more "modern" offerings. In fact, I believe the old kit is a work of art compared to Revell's latest 1/32 Spitfire MkII, which is covered in sunken rivet divots and wide panel lines despite "CAD" and "slide molding (although I am combining the nice interior of the new kit with the nice exterior of the old kit in my model). Just because an item is "new" does not mean it's "good", and just because an item is "old" does not mean it's "bad", and there are still old kits with plenty to offer (kinda like people I guess!). This was my point. We've kinda hijacked this thread, so we should probably get back on topic--and I'm glad to see Tamiya offering new items in any scale or genre-- you can usually count on them to do good work in either 1/48 or 1/32 scale. 😊
VR, Russ
M4A1Sherman
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Posted: Friday, April 19, 2019 - 06:05 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You've read too much into my comment. I wasn't trying to be "prickly" and I wasn't directing my comment at anyone. I was just saying for modelers in general not to "discount" the older kit just because it's "old", because it still has a lot to offer, and many younger modelers (younger than I am) don't realize the Revell 1/32 Spitfire, Tony, Frank, and Jack were some of the first kits to have beautifully engraved and accurate panel lines-- real mold maker works of art. The Japanese aircraft molds have been lost, making the kits collectors items, but the Spit can still be found-- usually dirt cheap because it's been "replaced" by more "modern" offerings. In fact, I believe the old kit is a work of art compared to Revell's latest 1/32 Spitfire MkII, which is covered in sunken rivet divots and wide panel lines despite "CAD" and "slide molding (although I am combining the nice interior of the new kit with the nice exterior of the old kit in my model). Just because an item is "new" does not mean it's "good", and just because an item is "old" does not mean it's "bad", and there are still old kits with plenty to offer (kinda like people I guess!). This was my point. We've kinda hijacked this thread, so we should probably get back on topic--and I'm glad to see Tamiya offering new items in any scale or genre-- you can usually count on them to do good work in either 1/48 or 1/32 scale. 😊
VR, Russ



Hi, Russ!

Re: "Prickly"- Not YOU specifically, Russ- A LOT of other modelers over on ARMORAMA seem to take what I say the wrong way, nearly every time I open my mouth. ESPECIALLY when I bring up WWII US/Allied Tanks, the Men, their Equipments and Uniforms and the attention to their various details. In the "Aircraft Community", not so much. Actually, I think that the "Aircraft Community" seems to have a much less belligerent "atmosphere", no pun intended. I dunno, maybe I'm just getting a little bit "punchy" with all of the negative vibes over there, ESPECIALLY from the "Panzer-Clique"...

TAMIYA makes a top-notch product. Usually... They've had a few "Not-So-Goodniks", too. Their 1/48 Lancaster kits come to mind- Those Engine Nacelles-to-Wing Root problems with fit are pretty awful...

VR, Dennis

BTW, have a Nice Easter!
SgtRam
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Posted: Friday, April 19, 2019 - 08:35 AM UTC
You can find his build here