login   |    register
AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
flushing and cleaning Mission Model paint
drewgimpy
Visit this Community
Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 06:17 AM UTC
I have tried Mission Model paint and really like it. For those of you who also use it what is your flushing and cleaning routine for your airbrush? If I only use their cleaner/thinner it is going to get real expensive quickly. So what other products do you use to flush and clean your airbrush after using Mission Model paints?
M4A1Sherman
Visit this Community
New York, United States
Joined: May 02, 2013
KitMaker: 4,335 posts
Armorama: 4,078 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 06:30 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I have tried Mission Model paint and really like it. For those of you who also use it what is your flushing and cleaning routine for your airbrush? If I only use their cleaner/thinner it is going to get real expensive quickly. So what other products do you use to flush and clean your airbrush after using Mission Model paints?



Hi, Andrew!

I don't use the MISSION MODELS paints myself, but aren't they ACRYLICS? I would think that water, plain old isopropyl alcohol or some "El-Cheapo" Glass Cleaner that you can pick up at a "Dollar Store" would suffice for cleaning.

For THINNING/REDUCING your paint, I would stick with the MISSION MODELS Thinners, or whatever else that MISSION MODELS recommends-

So many guys on this site have run into trouble when they mix their paint-mix solutions with thinners that are manufactured by different companies than their paints are... What I mean is, TAMIYA Thinners with TAMIYA paint, TESTORS Thinners with TESTORS and/or Model Master II paints, etc. You need to be careful with TESTORS paints as they come in ACRYLICS, ENAMELS and LACQUERS, EACH of which will require the proper thinners.

The lesson here is, "READ YOUR LABELS"...

Hope this helps, and Good Luck!
drewgimpy
Visit this Community
Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 07:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I have tried Mission Model paint and really like it. For those of you who also use it what is your flushing and cleaning routine for your airbrush? If I only use their cleaner/thinner it is going to get real expensive quickly. So what other products do you use to flush and clean your airbrush after using Mission Model paints?



Hi, Andrew!

I don't use the MISSION MODELS paints myself, but aren't they ACRYLICS? I would think that water, plain old isopropyl alcohol or some "El-Cheapo" Glass Cleaner that you can pick up at a "Dollar Store" would suffice for cleaning.

For THINNING/REDUCING your paint, I would stick with the MISSION MODELS Thinners, or whatever else that MISSION MODELS recommends-

So many guys on this site have run into trouble when they mix their paint-mix solutions with thinners that are manufactured by different companies than their paints are... What I mean is, TAMIYA Thinners with TAMIYA paint, TESTORS Thinners with TESTORS and/or Model Master II paints, etc. You need to be careful with TESTORS paints as they come in ACRYLICS, ENAMELS and LACQUERS, EACH of which will require the proper thinners.

The lesson here is, "READ YOUR LABELS"...

Hope this helps, and Good Luck!



Thanks for the info. I have their cleaner/thinner and I use it. It is both a cleaner and a thinner. But at roughly $10 for 4 ounces I am looking for cheaper cleaning option. I have used window cleaner to flush it and it seems to work. Just wondering if there is anyone with more MMP experience who knows an effective trick or two.
jekrott
Visit this Community
Connecticut, United States
Joined: March 25, 2006
KitMaker: 480 posts
Armorama: 348 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 07:29 AM UTC
I use filter water for the first cleaning to get out most paint then will use the thinner from MISSION MODELS.This works well for me. Love MISSION MODELS paints
M4A1Sherman
Visit this Community
New York, United States
Joined: May 02, 2013
KitMaker: 4,335 posts
Armorama: 4,078 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 07:33 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I have tried Mission Model paint and really like it. For those of you who also use it what is your flushing and cleaning routine for your airbrush? If I only use their cleaner/thinner it is going to get real expensive quickly. So what other products do you use to flush and clean your airbrush after using Mission Model paints?



Hi, Andrew!

I don't use the MISSION MODELS paints myself, but aren't they ACRYLICS? I would think that water, plain old isopropyl alcohol or some "El-Cheapo" Glass Cleaner that you can pick up at a "Dollar Store" would suffice for cleaning.

For THINNING/REDUCING your paint, I would stick with the MISSION MODELS Thinners, or whatever else that MISSION MODELS recommends-

So many guys on this site have run into trouble when they mix their paint-mix solutions with thinners that are manufactured by different companies than their paints are... What I mean is, TAMIYA Thinners with TAMIYA paint, TESTORS Thinners with TESTORS and/or Model Master II paints, etc. You need to be careful with TESTORS paints as they come in ACRYLICS, ENAMELS and LACQUERS, EACH of which will require the proper thinners.

The lesson here is, "READ YOUR LABELS"...

Hope this helps, and Good Luck!



Thanks for the info. I have their cleaner/thinner and I use it. It is both a cleaner and a thinner. But at roughly $10 for 4 ounces I am looking for cheaper cleaning option. I have used window cleaner to flush it and it seems to work. Just wondering if there is anyone with more MMP experience who knows an effective trick or two.



TEN BUCKS for a FOUR OUNCE JAR of MISSION MODELS Thinners is a bit steep, in my opinion. That's how they make the REAL money, if you get my drift.

It sounds like Edward has a good alternative, but there again, he's using the MISSION MODELS Thinner as a CLEANER, which is what you wanted to see if you could avoid in the first place... Not to say that Ed is wrong by ANY MEANS- He's doing what works for him, and there's NOTHING wrong with that!

It sounds as if you already have a technique for cleaning and flushing your airbrush(es) THAT WORKS, so why change it? However, I can understand your asking about other, i.e cheaper alternatives. If you like to break your airbrush(es) down after use to clean it/them, you can also SOAK the various pertinent parts in a small jar or container of the glass cleaner for a while, and then rinse the parts by putting them in a fine sieve and running a fine stream of water over them to be rid of the glass cleaner.

As for myself, I still use Enamels and Lacquers, so my cleaning efforts are a bit more involved; I'm not going to go into all of that right now!

For sheer economy's sake, if I were you, I'd stick with the window cleaner and flush with water afterwards...
retiredyank
Visit this Community
Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
Armorama: 7,843 posts
Posted: Friday, March 08, 2019 - 08:45 AM UTC
I spray generic lacquer thinner(about 3-4 drops), through my brush. Then, 8-10 drop of water.
Darius359au
Visit this Community
South Australia, Australia
Joined: May 30, 2018
KitMaker: 24 posts
Armorama: 24 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 09, 2019 - 02:35 PM UTC
I wash out my airbrush with water then run some of their thinner through afterwards.
iflytb20
#501
Visit this Community
Kerala, India / भारत
Joined: August 25, 2009
KitMaker: 285 posts
Armorama: 89 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 09, 2019 - 05:23 PM UTC
As per the MMP YouTube channel, water works well to clean the airbrush between colors.

https://youtu.be/ktQ9VY1ZrYk

Have a look around the 6:45 mark. He uses water out of a spray bottle.
drewgimpy
Visit this Community
Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Saturday, March 09, 2019 - 06:36 PM UTC
Thanks all, looks like it will be water and windex, then their thinner for a final clean. I appreciate the help.
Belt_Fed
Visit this Community
New Jersey, United States
Joined: February 02, 2008
KitMaker: 1,385 posts
Armorama: 1,322 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 10, 2019 - 12:38 AM UTC
I fush as much as I can with water, then a few drops of their thinner to get the rest. If you are light on funds, you can mix the thinner with water for a bulkier but less potent option. It won't be as strong as straight thinner, so it will take a bit more time and/ or scrubbing to clean. However, it will stretch your thinner for longer.

It's not recommend to use anything but their thinner when cleaning your airbrush when using these paints. Lacquer thinners, Windex, and the like can ( allegedly) cause cross-contamination with the paint causing bad results.
Armorsmith
Visit this Community
Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 09, 2015
KitMaker: 1,040 posts
Armorama: 977 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 10, 2019 - 02:34 AM UTC
Word of caution. If you use a window cleaning product run water through your AB afterward. The ammonia in window cleaner will slowly eat away the the metal of the AB.
retiredyank
Visit this Community
Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
Armorama: 7,843 posts
Posted: Sunday, March 10, 2019 - 02:46 AM UTC
A good rule of thumb is to always flush your brush with water, after spraying any solvents through. This way, the next time you run it, there won't be anything to contaminate the mix.
drewgimpy
Visit this Community
Utah, United States
Joined: January 24, 2002
KitMaker: 835 posts
Armorama: 388 posts
Posted: Monday, March 11, 2019 - 04:39 PM UTC
Great info all. I appreciate it.
Charleygnarlyp290
Visit this Community
California, United States
Joined: May 07, 2013
KitMaker: 99 posts
Armorama: 82 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 12:36 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I spray generic lacquer thinner(about 3-4 drops), through my brush. Then, 8-10 drop of water.



This! Except use a bit more than a few drops! I have switched to lacquer thinner for cleaning my airbrush after any paint I use. Its cheap and works great.
Armorsmith
Visit this Community
Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 09, 2015
KitMaker: 1,040 posts
Armorama: 977 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 01:38 PM UTC
If using window cleaner be sure to rinse it with water or isopropyl alcohol. Most window cleaners contain ammonia which will corrode the metal parts of your AB over time.
Kevlar06
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,429 posts
Armorama: 1,916 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 03:48 PM UTC
Acrylics, Enamels, Lacquers, Fingernail Polish (which is all of the above), Automotive Acrylic Lacquers, Mission Models, Testors, Vallejo, Mig, Tamiya, Oils, Temperas, water based, oil based, alcohol based, ammonia based etc., etc., ad infinitum-- It's all the same to me-- the only thing I use to clean out my airbrush is good old cheap hardware store lacquer thinner out of a quart can (but I keep a gallon can in the garage to refill the quart can). Nothing else works better for cleaning out your airbrush--period. It's volatile (which means it evaporates quickly). It leaves no residue in the airbrush because it evaporates quickly, even more quickly when you run air through your airbrush. There is only one drawback-- It has an odor. I do use proprietary thinners for mixing, but I save tons of money on cleaning solutions. I also use it to clean paint out of jars, off the workbench, my hands (but I try to wear gloves most of the time). I also avoid spraying it in enclosed spaces and around open flames, and since I wear an MSA approved mask for all painting, regardless of type, I don't worry much about fumes or smell since I do almost all my painting in my garage workshop anyway. With the money I save, I can buy lots of those proprietary thinners for mixing different paints. And occasionally, when I really want a paint to "bite" the surface of the plastic, resin, or even metal--I'll use it to mix paint.
VR, Russ
TankManNick
Visit this Community
California, United States
Joined: February 01, 2010
KitMaker: 486 posts
Armorama: 481 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 04:15 PM UTC
Good to know! I've 'saved' it for difficult cleans but looks like I should use it all the time. Nothing messes up a painting session than crud in the AB...
M4A1Sherman
Visit this Community
New York, United States
Joined: May 02, 2013
KitMaker: 4,335 posts
Armorama: 4,078 posts
Posted: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 09:47 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Acrylics, Enamels, Lacquers, Fingernail Polish (which is all of the above), Automotive Acrylic Lacquers, Mission Models, Testors, Vallejo, Mig, Tamiya, Oils, Temperas, water based, oil based, alcohol based, ammonia based etc., etc., ad infinitum-- It's all the same to me-- the only thing I use to clean out my airbrush is good old cheap hardware store lacquer thinner out of a quart can (but I keep a gallon can in the garage to refill the quart can). Nothing else works better for cleaning out your airbrush--period. It's volatile (which means it evaporates quickly). It leaves no residue in the airbrush because it evaporates quickly, even more quickly when you run air through your airbrush. There is only one drawback-- It has an odor. I do use proprietary thinners for mixing, but I save tons of money on cleaning solutions. I also use it to clean paint out of jars, off the workbench, my hands (but I try to wear gloves most of the time). I also avoid spraying it in enclosed spaces and around open flames, and since I wear an MSA approved mask for all painting, regardless of type, I don't worry much about fumes or smell since I do almost all my painting in my garage workshop anyway. With the money I save, I can buy lots of those proprietary thinners for mixing different paints. And occasionally, when I really want a paint to "bite" the surface of the plastic, resin, or even metal--I'll use it to mix paint.
VR, Russ



Lacquer thinners are also EXTREMELY flammable, so be careful!...

I use the proper thinners which are called for by the various paint manufacturers. Since I mainly use Enamels and Lacquers, I don't need many different thinners. This keeps it simple. Once I've broken my airbrushes down, (ALWAYS ONE AT A TIME!!!), for EVERY SINGLE COLOR-CHANGE, I clean the parts with the recommended thinners, and then I will soak the parts in ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL, in order to get rid of any and all residues. Once these parts have soaked for about a half-hour, I will re-assemble my airbrush and then shoot clean air through it. Only then will I go on to the next color. In the meantime, if I need to work fast, I keep a SECOND airbrush clean and ready for use. Having extra airbrushes around comes in handy!

Air Regulators with Water Traps- I run two different air compressors, sometimes singly, other times, I will use BOTH at the same time. BOTH PAASCHE air compressors have air regulators with integral water traps, and I've installed TWO additional water traps in EACH of my airbrushes' air lines. Now this probably seems like "overkill", but I live in an area where humidity can be A REAL PROBLEM- The Southern Tier of Upstate New York can safely be called a "Temperate-Zone RAIN FOREST". For example, the weather for next week, (April 29 through May 5), in my area calls for rain EVERY DAY, with "some" flooding. The following week will supposedly be no different... SOGGY...

In any case, what I described in the preceding paragraphs above is my system, and it works for me. I have 5 airbrushes, and each one of them is marked SPECIFICALLY for different tasks. My various thinners and alcohol are also plainly and obviously marked...

NO DEVIATION, NO MISTAKES; EXCELLENT RESULTS...
cabasner
Visit this Community
Nevada, United States
Joined: February 12, 2012
KitMaker: 1,040 posts
Armorama: 989 posts
Posted: Saturday, April 27, 2019 - 10:58 AM UTC
To the original poster, you are a man after my own heart. I always am worried about how to clean my airbrush after running new/different paint through it. I know you can always use a manufacturer's proprietary thinner or cleaner, but it is ALWAYS a hugely expensive proposition. I also have Mission paints, but have not yet used them, and was interested in your thread. It's been my experience that lacquer thinner, even the cheap kind you can get at Lowe's or Home Depot, will clean just about anything. It is at the price of REALLY nasty odor. But if I can't clean up something with anything else, lacquer thinner has always worked for me.
panzerbob01
Visit this Community
Louisiana, United States
Joined: March 06, 2010
KitMaker: 3,104 posts
Armorama: 2,935 posts
Posted: Monday, April 29, 2019 - 03:08 PM UTC
Acetone. Basically, "Lacquer thinner" is acetone. Just go straight to the cheapo acetone jug.

For acryls; I thin with isopropanol (isopropyl alcohol) or water or generic blue glass-cleaner (some paints do better with one, some with another, some with mixtures - and the painting environment (humidity and temp) matter, so try the options. ALL are el cheapo.

Note: blue glass-cleaner comes in both ammoniated and ammonia-free "flavors" - so pick your poison! IF you always end your cleaning with isopropanol and then clean water, the ammonia issue is done.

Flow-increasers and other proprietary additives are always expensive - I use them only in small quantities, like adding a drop or 2 of flow enhancer to several mls of mixed paint. Never use these things for bulk thinning or cleaning, as other cheap agents are great for this stuff.

I rinse between acryl colors with water and glass-cleaner or isopropanol at high volumn and upped pressure (40+ PSI) and "back-flushing" - (blows all potential clogging out, rapid flow cleans needles nicely, etc.), and clean same - with final rinse with a little AB cleaner followed by good rinse with filtered water and by isopropanol... IF any paint is stubborn... run some acetone thru under hi-vol and pressure, followed by iso and water.

Enamels: Thin with cheap thinner, rinse with thinner at high vol and pressure between colors, clean with thinner, followed by acetone, rinsed with isopropanol.

Lacquers: thin with thinner or acetone, rinse with thinner followed by acetone, clean with acetone followed by isopropanol.

Note that alcohols, thinners and acetone in particular are volatile solvents - and, along with AB cleaner, should be used in properly exhaust-ventilated areas and wearing a rated mask... IF you can smell the stuff, you ARE inhaling it. Always wear at least a particulate filter mask to avoid inhaling any paint mist or particles, regardless of what solvent, thinner or other additives you are using. "Non-toxic" does not mean safe to be inhaled!

my 2c.

Bob
Kevlar06
Visit this Community
Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 3,429 posts
Armorama: 1,916 posts
Posted: Monday, April 29, 2019 - 04:02 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Acetone. Basically, "Lacquer thinner" is acetone. Just go straight to the cheapo acetone jug....)



Be careful here... I know Bob has a chemical background, and yes, acetone will also work, but it has some qualities that may make it unforgiving for airbrush use. In the past, lacquer thinners were petroleum based compounds, and contained certain esthers and alkyds which increased volatility, but also made it perfect for dissolving other petroleum based products (like enamels). Current regulations have seen an increase of acetone additives into lacquer thinner to reduce that volatility. But many lacquer thinners are not pure acetone, which reduces the speed of its "solvency". This is important as most airbrushes have been designed with rubber seals in the air delivery system which rapidly deteriorate with the organic ketones and other chemicals found in acetone. I have a can of acetone on my workbench I keep just for cleaning and prepping different metals (like brass) for painting. I also use it as a debonder for CA (acetone is the main ingredient in most commercial CA and acrylate debonders-- usually a thickening agent is also added). I never spray acetone through my airbrush because it can attack the rubber seals found in the air delivery system (left long enough, lacquer thinner will do the same). And if left too long on a chromed finish, it can also attack the chrome--but so will lacquer thinner-- it just takes longer). So, my advice is to stick with lacquer thinner, the effect on your airbrush may be more "forgiving" than acetone. The lesson here-- don't leave your airbrush to soak in lacquer thinner OR acetone (or ANY ammonia based product--which for sure will attack most chrome finishes over time--this is why you should never put latex paint on un-primed metal finishes, like gutters, because one of the ingredients in many older latex paints was Ammonia). Whatever you use, make sure you blow your airbrush completely dry as Bob suggests before you put it away. I always leave mine disassembled in a cup to dry overnight after I've cleaned them. Because of humidity in my area, I also leave the needle out of the brush, as they can oxidize inside the nozzle (two of my single action airbrushes are more than30 years old) because the chrome finish is almost completely gone, leaving them susceptible to corrosion.
VR, Russ
czebas
Visit this Community
United States
Joined: October 04, 2012
KitMaker: 5 posts
Armorama: 5 posts
Posted: Friday, May 24, 2019 - 09:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I have tried Mission Model paint and really like it. For those of you who also use it what is your flushing and cleaning routine for your airbrush? If I only use their cleaner/thinner it is going to get real expensive quickly. So what other products do you use to flush and clean your airbrush after using Mission Model paints?



Createx 4012 is the same thing. The createx 4030 is also the same as the mission models poly.