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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Review
Vallejo: Painting Civil Vehicles
varanusk
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Sunday, February 24, 2019 - 07:01 AM UTC


A review of Eugene Tur''s volume on painting and weathering civil vehicles using Vallejo products

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If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
bill_c
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MODEL SHIPWRIGHTS
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Posted: Monday, February 25, 2019 - 05:02 AM UTC
I hate to be a grammar Nazi, but can't these companies hire a native English speaker? "Civil" in most cases means "polite," not "civilian." The exception is for a GENERAL civilian or national sense as in "civil defense" or "civil war."

Reminds me of the old Italeri PAK 40 kit that bore the designation "anti-tank gun with servants."
varanusk
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ARMORAMA
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Posted: Monday, February 25, 2019 - 08:43 PM UTC
Hi Bill,
Not being native speaker I may be wrong, and in fact my English skills have been put in doubt here several times but I found that in this case, according to the Cambridge Dictionary the definitionof Civil is:
[before noun] not military or religious, or relating to the ordinary people of a country.

Examples of use from the same dictionary:
Helicopters are mainly used for military rather than civil use.
After ten years of military dictatorship, the country now has a civil government.
We weren't married in church, but we had a civil ceremony in a registry office.


Also the Merriam-Webster:
1a : of or relating to citizens
civil duties
b : of or relating to the state or its citizenry
civil strife

They refer to polite on the second (MW) and third (Cambridge) meaning
Tank1812
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Posted: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 03:02 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I hate to be a grammar Nazi, but can't these companies hire a native English speaker? "Civil" in most cases means "polite," not "civilian." The exception is for a GENERAL civilian or national sense as in "civil defense" or "civil war."

Reminds me of the old Italeri PAK 40 kit that bore the designation "anti-tank gun with servants."



Bill I get what your saying but those vehicles look to be governmental of some type and probably as they intended civil servant vehicles. If any of the equipment is privately owned then you are correct civilian would probably be a better choice.
bill_c
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Posted: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 05:53 AM UTC
You both make good points, though I think the use of "civil" to mean "governmental" is a bit specific for this sort of general guide. I haven't read the book, and don't know if the examples are government vehicles or commercial ones.
Tank1812
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Posted: Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 08:50 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You both make good points, though I think the use of "civil" to mean "governmental" is a bit specific for this sort of general guide. I haven't read the book, and don't know if the examples are government vehicles or commercial ones.



The cover sheet and preview pages show what looks to be an Eastern European Dept of Transportation type truck. The numbering of the roller seems like a very governmental way of tracking things. Maybe Carlos can enlighten us on the equipment. I will probably get the book at some point.