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World War II: Japan
Aircraft of Japan in WWII.
Hosted by Rowan Baylis
First Shapeways Experience
c4willy
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Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 01:22 AM UTC
I've been investigating investing in a 3D printer as I could see the benefits of manufacturing one off parts for mods or replacements. I've also fooled around with some simple cad programs to create the templates for parts. I wonder if there's a resource out there for 3D printed parts templates??

I've been looking at shapeways for a while and wondered about their product my thanks for the look at one of their offerings it's been informative.
mrockhill
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Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 11:04 PM UTC
Its simply amazing to me that such things are available, my hats off to whoever decided the world needed scale replicas of WWII japanese floatplane cradles and launch catapaults and took the time to design them. I also scratch my head as to how one designs such complex and arcane things, that took a certain inspiration to create, and then not try to "print" them.
rdt1953
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Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 10:46 PM UTC
Thanks for the input Joel - I was on the fence about ordering the catapult itself given the amount of work it may need and limited access to do said work. Then I got an email from Shapeways offering CyberMonday discounts and free shipping so I pulled the trigger on it . I'll post pics when it arrives. Richard
Joel_W
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Posted: Monday, November 27, 2017 - 10:25 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Ok, doesn't sound sound like the frosted ultra then.

Found this link that deals with the textural problem with one type of nylon print from shapeways.



Thanks to Iain's link I have learned that this material is in powder form before printing and therefore the texture runs throughout the component. Scraping as I initially did may only expose subsequent layers of texture so repetitive priming and block sanding may be the only way to go .
Richard



Richard,
I know virtually nothing about 3D printing, so my comments as usual are from a plastic modelers point of view.

the casting while making for a ton of clean up, doesn't require gluing any parts together, so fit isn't an issue, nor having a poor fit requiring filling and more sanding isn't an issue either. On the other hand painting looks to be concern where getting your Air Brush into all those small nooks and crannies could be a challenge. Same for realistic weathering.

So far from the pictures and your narrative, I'd say that you made the right decision, and 3D printing does have it's place in Scale plastic modeling.

Joel
rdt1953
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 04:47 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Ok, doesn't sound sound like the frosted ultra then.

Found this link that deals with the textural problem with one type of nylon print from shapeways.



Thanks to Iain's link I have learned that this material is in powder form before printing and therefore the texture runs throughout the component. Scraping as I initially did may only expose subsequent layers of texture so repetitive priming and block sanding may be the only way to go .
Richard
Merlin
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 03:10 PM UTC
Hi Iain

Thanks for the explanation. I took a look and there's some interesting stuff listed.

All the best

Rowan
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 05:45 AM UTC
Ok, doesn't sound sound like the frosted ultra then.

Found this link that deals with the textural problem with one type of nylon print from shapeways.
rdt1953
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 03:59 AM UTC

Quoted Text

The material you have there looks like the frosted ultra detail, which is a uv cure acrylic resin.
If that's the case, then it may have benefited from a few minutes under a uv lamp or an hour in some direct sun just to ensure full cure.
Being resin you could also probably be a bit more aggressive with the sandpaper and use a 400 grit to smooth out the texture.



Thanks for your help Iain - seems you may have some experience with this stuff.
Shapeways states the material is " White strong and flexible- a white nylon plastic with a frosted finish " - this may be different than acrylic resin - if it is I presume it is used for its apparent higher tensile strength- again , I am not certain as this is all new to me. Cheers - Richard
Pave-Hawk
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 03:31 AM UTC
The material you have there looks like the frosted ultra detail, which is a uv cure acrylic resin.
If that's the case, then it may have benefited from a few minutes under a uv lamp or an hour in some direct sun just to ensure full cure.
Being resin you could also probably be a bit more aggressive with the sandpaper and use a 400 grit to smooth out the texture.
rdt1953
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Posted: Sunday, November 26, 2017 - 12:17 AM UTC
Thanks Rowan & Iain - I believe Iain is correct as it would seem a little impractical to physically test make everything offered as the number of products is mind boggling. I also think that I must be the first to buy this item as the printing issues were only discovered after my purchase.

I have shot the cradle with primer and it revealed that quite a bit of cleanup remained to be done.



Here is cradle after another hour's work and a second coat of Stynylrez primer -



Much better but could stand even more attention. For future reference it may be best to prime after washing then begin cleanup as the translucent nature of the product makes it difficult to see imperfections -I would also caution against using Vallejo primers because they are unsandable and this product needs sanding in spades.

The jury is still out for me on this - the catapult itself is likely to require 5 to 10 times the amount of cleanup that this small component needed. If one could live with the pebbly/striated textures then it would be a no-brainer as the detail and overall feel of it are very nice indeed but,because short of scratch build with no plans or the paper model route ,it seems to be the only game in town for 1/48. If the printed catapult was in two or more pieces so the interior was accessible it would be better but I assume it is one piece for the catapult and one for the base.

I'll sleep on it a bit but will likely weaken and buy in - we'll see.
More input on this would be valuable to me - Thanks - Richard
Pave-Hawk
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Posted: Saturday, November 25, 2017 - 04:28 PM UTC

Quoted Text

I'm confused, though, that they initially said it was unprintable - you've have thought they'd have checked for any issues before offering the item for sale


There are two stages of checks at shapeways, the first is an automated check that will tell you if the design file is a valid 3D object that can be printed.
The final check is by humans when they actually attempt to print it, and they make the final determination of whether the detail might be to fine or if there is something else that will prevent a successful print in the chosen material.

A shapeways store may just be creating objects for sale, and the seller may not have tried a test print on every object, because that could get very expensive if they are offering a lot of items for sale.
Merlin
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Posted: Saturday, November 25, 2017 - 02:49 PM UTC
Hi Richard

It's very neat and save hours and hours of scratchbuilding. I'm confused, though, that they initially said it was unprintable - you've have thought they'd have checked for any issues before offering the item for sale.

All the best

Rowan
rdt1953
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Posted: Saturday, November 25, 2017 - 03:53 AM UTC
Hi to all-
I thought I might share my first Shapeways/3D printing experience .

I've been wanting to do a floatplane and catapult for some time so I have begun to explore it a bit. A google search for IJN 1/48 catapult led me to Shapeways. The catapult itself is offered along with cradles and deck trollies for both single and twin float configurations. A number of other items are also available for deck handling-rails, turntables and I believe a crane as well.
As this is my first experience with 3D printing of any sort I ordered only the single float cradle - approx $ 17 USD plus shipping vs $ 145 USD for the catapult - a little easier to absorb if I was unhappy with the product.
So far the experience has been great. I ordered the cradle and within the hour I got a communication from Shapeways saying that the product was not printable due to the design . Within the next hour I received further communication from both Shapeways and the designer saying the problem had been corrected and i could re- order which I did.
I received it today - the entire process took about one week.






The material seems to be nylon - a slight sintered texture is apparent . I spent about one half hour lightly scraping with a new # 11 blade and 800 silicon carbide paper before taking photos . I don't know if the real thing had rivets - it likely did - but there are none on the product so clean up was simplified and they are easily added if needed.

After a wash up in soapy water I plan to hit it with the excellent Stynylrez Primer from Badger in grey . I'll update this post afterwords with the results.
Any and all input is certainly welcome as this is my first rodeo in 3D print town .
Cheers - Richard