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Discussions on the latest and greatest tools, glues, and gadgets.
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Airbrush or Brush?
ModelbouwNL
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Gelderland, Netherlands
Joined: August 14, 2017
KitMaker: 10 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 02:09 AM GMT+7
Hello everybody,

Recently I was thinking. Is the airbrush easier then painting the model with a brush? Or is an brush easier? And what are the disadvantages of both tools?
Hope you guys can clearify in some way for me.
Thank you.
Tojo72
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New Jersey, United States
Joined: June 06, 2006
KitMaker: 4,216 posts
Armorama: 3,198 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 03:04 AM GMT+7
You can model with a brush,and there are some masters who do fantastic brush work for sure.But if you want to take modeling to the next level,get an airbrush.

It helps with modulation,gloss finishes,natural metal finishes,soft free hand camo work,large models.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,208 posts
Armorama: 636 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 03:58 AM GMT+7
it depends on the subject you're working on, and your definition of "easier". Some parts of a model may lend themselves to brush painting, while others might look better with an airbrush. Any "mottled" or "feathered" camouflage will look better with an airbrush. Certainly it's easier to clean up a brush than an airbrush, but what's "easier" may not look the best either. Once you get into the routine of using an airbrush, it becomes easier to use one.
VR, Russ
ModelbouwNL
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Gelderland, Netherlands
Joined: August 14, 2017
KitMaker: 10 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 05:50 AM GMT+7
Anthony,
I agree that the airbrush is better for larger models. And sinds I'm building now 1:35 models, it will be an argument for an airbrush. And could you explain me about the things you said in the rule below?
ModelbouwNL
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Gelderland, Netherlands
Joined: August 14, 2017
KitMaker: 10 posts
Armorama: 3 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 05:57 AM GMT+7

Quoted Text

it depends on the subject you're working on, and your definition of "easier". Some parts of a model may lend themselves to brush painting, while others might look better with an airbrush. Any "mottled" or "feathered" camouflage will look better with an airbrush. Certainly it's easier to clean up a brush than an airbrush, but what's "easier" may not look the best either. Once you get into the routine of using an airbrush, it becomes easier to use one.
VR, Russ



Thank you for the advice,

What my definition of easier is: Less work to do. So that I can paint it for an example with an mold and that is ready.
And what are weathered and mottled cammo? And at the moment I build most of all German vehicles of the second world war.
Kevlar06
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Washington, United States
Joined: March 15, 2009
KitMaker: 1,208 posts
Armorama: 636 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:12 AM GMT+7
"Feathered" camouflage is where the edges of the paint are soft-- as if they are sprayed on. "Mottled" camouflage is where the camouflage is a series of "spots" with feathered edges-- look at a late war Messerschmitt 109, sometimes they had a "Mottled" or spotted appearance on the sides. Most German armor and aircraft were painted with air guns, which would leave a feathered edge. An airbrush is not "easier" than a paint brush, because great care has to be taken with preparing and applying paint, and then cleaning the airbrush to get the desired effect. But it is a better way to get more realistic and authentic paint effects. And it requires some practice as well-- but so do most things that are worthwhile. Try it, you might like it. Just remember, keeping an airbrush clean and in top operating condition is key to an expert paint finish.
VR, Russ
RobinNilsson
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Stockholm, Sweden
Joined: November 29, 2006
KitMaker: 2,180 posts
Armorama: 1,948 posts
Posted: Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 04:00 AM GMT+7
If we leave all the advanced techniques and methods aside for a while there is some simple things as well.
When I got myself my first airbrush many years ago I had just finished painting the lower hull on a Leopard 1 (Italeri ?).
The next kit I painted using the airbrush and realised that I could get a nice and even coverage of all the little corners and details on the lower hull/chassis a LOT faster than using a normal brush.

On a more general level: There is no such thing as a "best" tool when comparing different methods/technologies.
Which tool is the best: a hammer or a screwdriver?
Answer: Both. Sometimes I need to hammer a nail and sometimes I need the screwdriver for a screw.
Using the hammer for the screw will end badly and the screwdriver gets nowhere with the nail.

The airbrush can do easily do things that are very difficult using a brush and vice versa.

/ Robin
Tonypots
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New York, United States
Joined: September 06, 2017
KitMaker: 6 posts
Armorama: 4 posts
Posted: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 06:17 AM GMT+7
I've been building models for 50 years. Started with cars and sci-fi in the 60's now its mostly 1/35 armor. I have used an airbrush
extensively when I had the space in my home basement. It's a great
tool that allows you to do advanced paint schemes. Now that we have downsized I don't have a room or space . So I use Tamyia spray can and bottled paint. At least on my models with all the weathering, its not an issue. I loved my airbrush and if you have the space go for it. I practiced on old models to get
the techniques right. IMHO it took me to the next level. I was never able to get a good result hand painting larger surface areas. That's why I use a spray can, even if I can't use my airbrush. Today with all the options out there you should give
it a try. Regards, Tony