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Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Weathering a die-cast model?
joegrafton
#059
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United Kingdom
Joined: October 04, 2009
KitMaker: 1,209 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 12:52 AM UTC
Hi,
I bought this for Christmas!

It's a 1/32nd scale Code3 FDNY Seagrave Pumper in die-cast metal. Now I normally don't touch die-cast models as I prefer to build them myself but I can't get a good fire truck in the scale I require! So I purchased this in order to weather it & make it look real!
Here's some more photos:






What I would like to know is how to go about the weathering process. I've done weathering on plastic/resin kits before like this one:

But as this fire truck is a rare model I don't want to mess it up! And I've never weathered die-cast before!
Any thoughts & suggestions would be most helpful. Thanks in advance!

Joe.

Armored76
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Bayern, Germany
Joined: September 30, 2013
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 01:34 AM UTC
I haven't done this before either but why would you think this is any different compared to the plastic/resin models?

I would add scratches using the sponge technique and/or a (00)0 brush then apply an acrylic clear coat (satin? gloss?) to protect the paint from adverse effects then it's all washes and pigments as usual.

...or maybe I'm missing the obvious point here?
HeavyArty
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Virginia, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 01:35 AM UTC
The weathering process is the same w/die-cast as any other model. That said, other than the tires and maybe a little (very little) dirt and dust on the running boards, there should be no weathering to be seen on it. Fire trucks are kept spotless by their crews. Pretty much all they do when not responding to a fire is train and polish the trucks. I wouldn't do much to it at all.

Some examples of pristine, in-service FDNY fire trucks.




If you really wanted to, you could dirty it up as if it were working in the winter and had some road slime from salt and sand on it. This would not be on it long though as the crew would wash it as soon as it got back to the firehouse.

This is the only pic I could find of a dirty FDNY truck.

brekinapez
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Georgia, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 01:45 AM UTC
I lived in Manhattan for a decade and Gino is right; all they do is clean their vehicles and gear all day.
Armorsmith
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 02:07 AM UTC
Ditto what Gino and Shell said. I go by 2 fire stations everyday and just about all I see the guys do is clean their vehicles. Even after responding to a call about the first thing they do when they get back is to start cleaning their equipment.
Michalovic
Joined: March 01, 2007
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 02:54 AM UTC
If you did want to weather it, there's an article in Issue 4, Engine, Grease & Oil of the Weathering magazine by MIG. Also a couple of articles online in model railroad forums. The article covers weathering a piece of road construction equipment.

You have to give most die cast models a coat of flat paint to give the weathering materials something to grip onto and stay in place. Also tones down the toy-like appearance of the models.
HeavyArty
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 03:07 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You have to give most die cast models a coat of flat paint to give the weathering materials something to grip onto and stay in place. Also tones down the toy-like appearance of the models.



Most yes (esp. construction equipment), a fire engine, no. They should be extra shiny for the reasons listed in the above posts.
joegrafton
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 03:30 AM UTC
Thanks for your posts fellas!
I know all about polishing these damn things! I'm a full time firefighter in London Fire Brigade for 20 years! Polished a few of these in my time! Lol!
So your points have raised a question or two! I understand that the weathering can't be heavy on this piece as they are always kept clean. But there is always some amount of dirt on them, especially around the pump bay!
Also, as the paint is to be kept shiny, should I use a satin varnish so I have something for the washes & subsequent steps to adhere to?
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 03:36 AM UTC
And while I'm at it can anybody help with this?
The model is fitted with two hole wheel rims like this:


The real Pumper is fitted with 5 hole wheel rims like this:


Can anyone help in obtaining a set of six 5 hole wheels in 1/32nd scale, like the set on the real thing in the photo above, please?
The wheel with tyre on the model has a diameter of approximately 25mm, if this helps!
Thanks in advance!
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
Joined: December 21, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 04:19 AM UTC
Hi Joe,

For the 5-hole wheels, please see this: http://www.modelcarsmag.com/forums/topic/113944-looking-for-info-on-132-scale-5-slot5-hole-semi-rims/

Thanks for being a fire fighter. You guys are heros.
JPTRR
Staff MemberManaging Editor
RAILROAD MODELING
#051
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Tennessee, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 04:21 AM UTC
A site for fire fighting models: http://donmillsmodels.com/product-category/132nd-scale-fire-apparatus/
HeavyArty
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Virginia, United States
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Posted: Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 01:36 AM UTC

Quoted Text

...as the paint is to be kept shiny, should I use a satin varnish so I have something for the washes & subsequent steps to adhere to?



I wound only use any type of satin or flat coat sparingly in areas I was going to apply the weathering to. That way you don't flatten out the whole vehicle and then have to go back and shine it up again.