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Conversions and Scratch Builds
r2d2
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: April 13, 2006
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Armorama: 393 posts
Posted: Monday, July 04, 2016 - 06:35 PM UTC
Here are some of my projects:

http://armorama.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=176563&page=1


http://armorama.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=191985&page=1


http://armorama.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=182727&page=1


http://armorama.kitmaker.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=172376&page=1
165thspc
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Kentucky, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, July 05, 2016 - 01:03 AM UTC
Val - I picked out a few of your images to repost here. Perhaps to inspire even more viewers.

In Val's world Braille Rules!






Guys, that slat armor is scratch built!!!
165thspc
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Posted: Tuesday, July 05, 2016 - 01:20 AM UTC
1/35th Scale Steyr Cargo Truck: (Combo of Tamiya Medium Field Car and Scratch Built Load Box)


Rear "wood" portion of truck body and troop seats was built using individual board on board construction.


Additional scratch details: Spare tire mount, battery box, angled front tires, parking brake cables and strengthening braces for all three entry steps.

Please note weight reduction holes in frame members - many Steyrs had these. The Steyr frame was made up of an enclosed box beam rather than the usual "C" Channel with open holes drilled only on the inside portion of the beam.


Admittedly the dual rear wheels were probably post war but I could not resist adding them.

* I found out later that there is a resin kit made of this vehicle but I still like mine better. #1 - It was a lot cheaper. #2 - I learned more from building this one rather than buying a ready made kit. #3 You cannot see daylight between the floorboards and sidewalls of the resin kit.


Reference photo supplied by Frenchy. Considerable reference can be found in the "Wings & Wheels Publications" book covering this restored Steyr 1500-2 vehicle.
jrutman
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Posted: Tuesday, July 05, 2016 - 01:23 AM UTC
Excellent stuff keeps showing up here. This has turned into one of my favorite threads ever.
J
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 12:03 AM UTC
A note about those weight reduction holes in the Steyr frames:

This might be a level of detailing that is more than anyone would feel necessary to take on but we all know that I'm crazy so you have to consider the source.

As said, the Steyr employed a box girder frame rather than the more common "C" channel construction. They drilled holes in only the inside surfaces of the girders to reduce weight and save metal.

(While this MAY have been lighter and possibly stronger than the standard "C" channel construction, I feel exposing the inside of this box beam to moisture plus the dirt and mud buildup would promote rust and totally off-set any advantage gained.)

In any case I wanted to give modeling this construction method a try. I was building several Steyrs at the time and came up with a system for creating this affect:




165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 01:33 AM UTC
I do hope this makes sense for creating the weight reduction holes in the Steyr frame:

- Start by thinning and shaping the outside surface of the frame member.
- Drill the necessary weight reduction holes through the frame as desired.
- Using a #11 X-acto blade with a gentle twisting motion, taper the holes from the outside in.
- Cap off the holes on the outside with a thin strip of Evergreen plastic.
- Do a final sanding/shaping and you are done.



STEYR FRAME


Adding the taper to the holes keeps your eye from seeing the inside of the drilled hole and gives the impression that the box beam is truly hollow. Further, it gives the feeling that the box beam is made out of material of scale thickness.

I noticed in reference photos that the Steyr workers actually routed electrical and cable connections through the frame for extra protection. I added some of this cabling to enhance the impression that the frame was actually hollow.
Namabiiru
#399
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 02:00 AM UTC
Mike,
Your Steyr looks great! But, yes, that does seem like an extraordinary amount of effort for something probably utterly unseen unless displayed on a mirror base.

That said, your explanation and drawings are perfectly clear. A very imaginative solution. I notice in the photos it looks like the blade might have left a bit of unevenness to the holes. Perhaps instead of an Xacto blade to taper your holes a conical burr on a Dremel might alleviate that and be easier to execute.

165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 02:12 AM UTC
Mark, I think you are right. I should have used a rotary burr to taper the holes!

(I will gladly take that beer now!)

Cheers
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 02:32 AM UTC
Here is the Kommandeurwagon to go with the cargo version of the Steyr truck that I posted earlier.

This one is more or less OOB other than the frame work, the flat tire scenario and the fact that I hinged the back of the rear seat so it could be moved forward to access the storage area behind it. (Which was a common design practice in that era.)




In the lower photo you can see the rear seat back folded forward.
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 02:46 AM UTC

Quoted Text

. . . yes, that does seem like an extraordinary amount of effort for something probably utterly unseen unless displayed on a mirror base.



Sometimes it is more significant to practice or master a technique than it is what the model ends up looking like.

No argument, just say'n.
Namabiiru
#399
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 02:51 AM UTC
Quite right.

I have seen a couple of diatribes in the forums about what a colossal waste of time scratch-building is, and I heartily disagree.

165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 04:06 AM UTC
"Scratch Building a Waste of Time???"

I am both a frustrated architect and frustrated mechanical design engineer so for me "scratch building" (and converting)
absolutely IS the hobby!

This Australian aircraft crane truck is soon to be one of my next undertakings:

Think of the impression, in 1/35th scale, this one will make on the judges as it sits in the "Scratch Built & Conversions" category! This model will be both; a converted CCKW and a scratch built crane! (I might even have an L-4 Grasshopper with a crumpled landing leg hanging off of the crane!)


The L-4 Grasshopper. - I know this looks like a photograph of a model but it is the real deal in flight!
(Photo Mike Koenig)
KelticKnot
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 04:19 AM UTC
I concur. I was an OOB, crappy paint job builder until I returned to the hobby last year. Following others' scratchbuilding here has opened my eyes to a whole new realm of possibilities.
I've been inspired to go completely crazy with my current labour of love : My 1/48 Lancaster with detailed interior.

Progress shots:





165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 04:24 AM UTC
GREAT!

Way to go Paul - it looks like you are right on target.

I have a whole 'nother level of respect for anyone who can do aircraft!
r2d2
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 07:18 AM UTC
Great to see amazing works here!
r2d2
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 07:22 AM UTC
Michael here is my detailing of the already very good Accurate Armour
http://www.armorama.co.uk/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBox&file=index&req=viewtopic&topic_id=144195&page=1
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 07:58 AM UTC
This is great work Val, as you know I have a weakness for ARV's.

okdoky
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 10:37 AM UTC
Some lovely itchy scratchy in all scales !! Love how folks get so much detail in the braile scales and 1/35 !!

Here a few of my efforts but I find they take so much time of hunting sizes and details I tend to get few done !!

All 1/24 scale





























Nige
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 01:39 PM UTC
Nige thanks for joining in here. You are into just the kind of "stuff" I enjoy; military trucks! The DROPS vehicle is really impressive! You need to turn the camera just a little more to the right and show us some of those derelict cars you are working on!

p.s. I also like the looks of that Land Rover (I'm guessing Defender or Lite-Weight) that you are taking on there!
DocEvan
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 01:55 PM UTC
Why not just use rectangular styrene tubing for the frame rails? that would save some of the work you did.


Quoted Text

I do hope this makes sense for creating the weight reduction holes in the Steyr frame:

- Start by thinning and shaping the outside surface of the frame member.
- Drill the necessary weight reduction holes through the frame as desired.
- Using a #11 X-acto blade with a gentle twisting motion, taper the holes from the outside in.
- Cap off the holes on the outside with a thin strip of Evergreen plastic.
- Do a final sanding/shaping and you are done.



STEYR FRAME


Adding the taper to the holes keeps your eye from seeing the inside of the drilled hole and gives the impression that the box beam is truly hollow. Further, it gives the feeling that the box beam is made out of material of scale thickness.

I noticed in reference photos that the Steyr workers actually routed electrical and cable connections through the frame for extra protection. I added some of this cabling to enhance the impression that the frame was actually hollow.

DocEvan
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 01:59 PM UTC
If I may add a non-military subject, here is the winch tower for a Holmes 515 Traffic King wrecker, slated for a 1956 Ford F500. Scale is 1/25th.

I'm almost finished with the booms. The wrecker will have decals for "Bunsen Ford". Lake Wobegon fans will get the inside joke.


okdoky
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 07:46 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Nige thanks for joining in here. You are into just the kind of "stuff" I enjoy; military trucks! The DROPS vehicle is really impressive! You need to turn the camera just a little more to the right and show us some of those derelict cars you are working on!



Michael ! Thanks for the kind words ! ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, The rusfy car is Pete's (AKA Noddy) as Pete was kind enough to let Steve Bellerby ( another fabulous scratch builder) and I join him at Perth ! ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Pete was awarded a prize for that cracking build !
barkingdigger
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ARMORAMA
#013
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Joined: June 20, 2008
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 08:14 PM UTC

Quoted Text

The wrecker will have decals for "Bunsen Ford". Lake Wobegon fans will get the inside joke.



Ah, Garrison Keillor - I hadn't thought about him in ages!

"where the women are strong, the men are good-looking, and the children are above average" (or words to that effect!)

That winch is cracking stuff - love those toothed drums. (Hate to think how many failed attempts it took to make them with perfect teeth...)
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 10:53 PM UTC
Doc, I don't think a scratch built Holmes wrecker is out of place at all!


(Please forgive that mine is the Mirror kit whereas your beautiful work is scratch!)
165thspc
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Posted: Wednesday, July 06, 2016 - 10:59 PM UTC
Doc, as far as the Steyr frame work goes, the frame was rectangular in cross section. It was also tapered AND formed so replacing the main beams with square tubing I did not think to be an option.