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Dioramas
Do you love dioramas & vignettes? We sure do.
Another 105mm
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 08:48 AM UTC
Thanks Al and Nick,
I will do a lot more 'stressing" around the broken spokes area. I know what you mean about the bent off by pliers look. Broken things are seldom if ever that neat looking.
Nick has shown his mastery of broken things in his latest dio.
J
1stjaeger
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 08:52 AM UTC

Nick is right! To make damage look like "real" can be extremely tricky!!!

You've succeded m8!! Well done!! Show us more...please!!

Cheers

Romain

jrutman
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 08:54 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Nick is right! To make damage look like "real" can be extremely tricky!!!

You've succeded m8!! Well done!! Show us more...please!!

Cheers

Romain





I will get some more pics up soon buddy. Some of this work will seem to go quickly as it includes a lot of stuff that I had partially completed already a while ago.
J
justsendit
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Colorado, United States
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 09:30 AM UTC
Aesthetically destroyed ... Nice!!!

--mike
yeahwiggie
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Dalarnas, Sweden
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 07:21 PM UTC
Looks broken, not made indeed.
Maybe add 2-3 more bulletholes in the surrounding woodarea?
Would explain the broken wheel and you can add some nice spots of colour (splintered wood) to the build.
1stjaeger
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 07:36 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Looks broken, not made indeed.
Maybe add 2-3 more bulletholes in the surrounding woodarea?
Would explain the broken wheel and you can add some nice spots of colour (splintered wood) to the build.




Good idea!! Some shrapnel seems logical!

Cheers

Romain

Paulinsibculo
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Overijssel, Netherlands
Joined: July 01, 2010
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 10:09 PM UTC
Hi Jerry,

So you are about to destroy a " good old wagon"!
Just curious which dio you are going to create within the dio?
I am just wondering about the sequence you supply us with attractive new photos. You must be one of the very lucky few, able to spend all the free time on a dio.
I would love to be in that situation, but lawn mawers, vegetable garden and, o yeh, a 60 hrs job all over the world do not leave too much time for glue and paint.
Therefore, people like you do keep me motivated at least to keep on trying to end a started dio. My Ukranian farm only grows very, very, very slowely.
Thanks for being an example..

About the wooden wheels:
The outer part is a composition of segments, connected to the axle by spokes, hold together by the iron ring. In case this ring breaks, most likely the part with the spokes will fall off, since the single bolt, which is going through the ring and the wooden part is not a big one.
This is based on (very expensive) own experiences with our carriages during trail competions. Lukely not being shot at, but by hiting a tree that wanted to cross the track!!!
AlanL
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 10:28 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Jerry,

So you are about to destroy a " good old wagon"!
Just curious which dio you are going to create within the dio?
I am just wondering about the sequence you supply us with attractive new photos. You must be one of the very lucky few, able to spend all the free time on a dio.
I would love to be in that situation, but lawn mawers, vegetable garden and, o yeh, a 60 hrs job all over the world do not leave too much time for glue and paint.
Therefore, people like you do keep me motivated at least to keep on trying to end a started dio. My Ukranian farm only grows very, very, very slowely.
Thanks for being an example..

About the wooden wheels:
The outer part is a composition of segments, connected to the axle by spokes, hold together by the iron ring. In case this ring breaks, most likely the part with the spokes will fall off, since the single bolt, which is going through the ring and the wooden part is not a big one.
This is based on (very expensive) own experiences with our carriages during trail competions. Lukely not being shot at, but by hiting a tree that wanted to cross the track!!!



Hi Paul,

The number of trees throwing themselves in front of carriages and cars never ceases to amaze me. You'd think after all these years they would have learnt the highway code

Cheers

Al
Karl187
#284
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Northern Ireland, United Kingdom
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Posted: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - 10:36 PM UTC
You gonna paint your wagon Jerry?

Sorry, terrible joke I know !

Its a fantastic looking piece though, the small details like the .50cal damage, the front axle and the extra added wood grain really, even without any paint, bring it to life and tell a story. The broken wheel and the shape of it as it rests down on it just adds moreso to the story. I cannot wait to see it painted, I'm certain it will be a really stunning piece of this diorama.
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
Joined: April 10, 2011
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 02:56 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Looks broken, not made indeed.
Maybe add 2-3 more bulletholes in the surrounding woodarea?
Would explain the broken wheel and you can add some nice spots of colour (splintered wood) to the build.



Thanks for looking in and the suggestions buddy.
I was going to add some splintered wood,yes. That will go on when this wagon gets onto the base. As far as more bullet holes...maybe not. A strafing plane does not have a very tight "shot group" so even a P-47 with 8 guns blazing has a wide dispersal area of hits. I think I pushed it already with the two hits on this small vehicle. There are more hits around it,you will see as I go forward.
J
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 02:57 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Looks broken, not made indeed.
Maybe add 2-3 more bulletholes in the surrounding woodarea?
Would explain the broken wheel and you can add some nice spots of colour (splintered wood) to the build.




Good idea!! Some shrapnel seems logical!

Cheers





Romain

Yes,you are on the right track buddy. I explained the logic to Paul above.
J


jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 03:05 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Jerry,

So you are about to destroy a " good old wagon"!
Just curious which dio you are going to create within the dio?
I am just wondering about the sequence you supply us with attractive new photos. You must be one of the very lucky few, able to spend all the free time on a dio.
I would love to be in that situation, but lawn mawers, vegetable garden and, o yeh, a 60 hrs job all over the world do not leave too much time for glue and paint.
Therefore, people like you do keep me motivated at least to keep on trying to end a started dio. My Ukranian farm only grows very, very, very slowely.
Thanks for being an example..

About the wooden wheels:
The outer part is a composition of segments, connected to the axle by spokes, hold together by the iron ring. In case this ring breaks, most likely the part with the spokes will fall off, since the single bolt, which is going through the ring and the wooden part is not a big one.
This is based on (very expensive) own experiences with our carriages during trail competions. Lukely not being shot at, but by hiting a tree that wanted to cross the track!!!



Thanks Paul,
I would rather be in your shoes,believe it or not. I would rather have a nice job and be able to work and hold my head up high and not be all busted up in mind and body,dependant on the good will of others to live from month to month.
These little projects keep me focused on something to take my mind away from things. Don't missunderstand me though,I am grateful for all that is.
I see your point about the wheel. I do know exactly how they are made. I spent a few hours observing ang talking with the wagon maker at the "Dollywood" amusement park in Tenn. plus took a few good pics of cannon carriages at Gettysburg.
I think I will seperate the steel rim from the broken off portion of the wheel as the rim was usually only attached with two bolts,one at each end where they meet.
J
jrutman
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Pennsylvania, United States
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 03:07 AM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

Hi Jerry,

So you are about to destroy a " good old wagon"!
Just curious which dio you are going to create within the dio?
I am just wondering about the sequence you supply us with attractive new photos. You must be one of the very lucky few, able to spend all the free time on a dio.
I would love to be in that situation, but lawn mawers, vegetable garden and, o yeh, a 60 hrs job all over the world do not leave too much time for glue and paint.
Therefore, people like you do keep me motivated at least to keep on trying to end a started dio. My Ukranian farm only grows very, very, very slowely.
Thanks for being an example..

About the wooden wheels:
The outer part is a composition of segments, connected to the axle by spokes, hold together by the iron ring. In case this ring breaks, most likely the part with the spokes will fall off, since the single bolt, which is going through the ring and the wooden part is not a big one.
This is based on (very expensive) own experiences with our carriages during trail competions. Lukely not being shot at, but by hiting a tree that wanted to cross the track!!!



Hi Paul,

The number of trees throwing themselves in front of carriages and cars never ceases to amaze me. You'd think after all these years they would have learnt the highway code

Cheers

Al






I know right!! You would think they would get better tree "Ents". There are too many kamakazi charges across the roads.
J
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 03:09 AM UTC

Quoted Text

You gonna paint your wagon Jerry?

Sorry, terrible joke I know !

Its a fantastic looking piece though, the small details like the .50cal damage, the front axle and the extra added wood grain really, even without any paint, bring it to life and tell a story. The broken wheel and the shape of it as it rests down on it just adds moreso to the story. I cannot wait to see it painted, I'm certain it will be a really stunning piece of this diorama.





Thanks Karl,
I can always count on you to raise my spirits.
Bad day for this wagon and it's crew though.
J
Paulinsibculo
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Overijssel, Netherlands
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 03:21 AM UTC
Dear Jerry,
I do apologize. There was no intention to hurt. Pls. do read my PM.

To the wheels:
The outer wooden circle was made of several segments, each holding two or three spokes to the hub, which is around the axle. The outer diameter was a few milimeter more than the forged outer steel band. This steel band, having the width of the wooden wheel and some milimeters thik, was heated by the wheelmaker. In that way the diameter increased some milimeters and it was than put on the horizontal laying wooden wheel and hamered at its place. After it cooled down, the steel rim would pressure the wooden wheel segments, the felly, together and keep all segments in place. Sometimes, when the wheel was part of a wagon more often than of a luxury carriage, the wheelmaker would drill holes in the segments and the steel rim and put a flat lock bolt from the outside to the inside of each segment and put a nut on the inside.
The above forces the carriage owner to keep the wheels in good condition. If the wood would dry out too much (which sometimes happens with seldomly used antique carriages) the segments would shrink and the steel rim would get off. Thus making the wheel fall apart.
jrutman
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Posted: Sunday, July 20, 2014 - 03:35 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Dear Jerry,
I do apologize. There was no intention to hurt. Pls. do read my PM.

To the wheels:
The outer wooden circle was made of several segments, each holding two or three spokes to the hub, which is around the axle. The outer diameter was a few milimeter more than the forged outer steel band. This steel band, having the width of the wooden wheel and some milimeters thik, was heated by the wheelmaker. In that way the diameter increased some milimeters and it was than put on the horizontal laying wooden wheel and hamered at its place. After it cooled down, the steel rim would pressure the wooden wheel segments, the felly, together and keep all segments in place. Sometimes, when the wheel was part of a wagon more often than of a luxury carriage, the wheelmaker would drill holes in the segments and the steel rim and put a flat lock bolt from the outside to the inside of each segment and put a nut on the inside.
The above forces the carriage owner to keep the wheels in good condition. If the wood would dry out too much (which sometimes happens with seldomly used antique carriages) the segments would shrink and the steel rim would get off. Thus making the wheel fall apart.



Yes,thank you. I know how this all works with the wooden wheels. If you look at the previous post concerning the discovered limber that is being restored it illustrates your point. The limber,sitting in the sun and rain for decades outside,has suffered. It shows the wheels' wooden parts rotting and shrinking and the steel band coming loose,just like you said. Good call.
And no worries about me,I am fine and never thought that you were being mean or anything at all like that buddy. No worries.
J
jrutman
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 - 06:59 AM UTC
Got some more bits done.
Shot a coat of yellow paint on but lightened it up as almost every bottle of paint sold marked Panzer Dark Yellow is way too dark and/or greenish.
It will tone down with washes and weathering though.
Finished up the tongue detail



Added a drivers' footrest and the metal steps attached to this type of wagons' front axles. These helped the drivers up. Also made the hooks for the tree that the harness will attach to and some other fittings,etc.


I think the change I made to the broken wheel will make Paul happier. It fits the geometry of the wooden wagon wheel better.



Now for the tactical markings and the red crosses. Too paint or decal,that is the question?
Anyone know what the markings look like for a medical vehicle in an Inf Regt in 1944?
J
Paulinsibculo
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Overijssel, Netherlands
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 - 07:10 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Got some more bits done.
Shot a coat of yellow paint on but lightened it up as almost every bottle of paint sold marked Panzer Dark Yellow is way too dark and/or greenish.
It will tone down with washes and weathering though.
Finished up the tongue detail



Added a drivers' footrest and the metal steps attached to this type of wagons' front axles. These helped the drivers up. Also made the hooks for the tree that the harness will attach to and some other fittings,etc.


I think the change I made to the broken wheel will make Paul happier. It fits the geometry of the wooden wagon wheel better.



Now for the tactical markings and the red crosses. Too paint or decal,that is the question?
Anyone know what the markings look like for a medical vehicle in an Inf Regt in 1944?
J



jrutman
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 - 08:42 AM UTC
Heeheehee,I thought you would like that.
I did find the tac markings BTW,
J
Mark
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Noord-Brabant, Netherlands
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Posted: Monday, July 21, 2014 - 04:47 PM UTC
This is so much fun to watch and really motivational!!

great work! keep us posted please!

Mark
jrutman
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Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 - 03:36 AM UTC

Quoted Text

This is so much fun to watch and really motivational!!

great work! keep us posted please!

Mark



Thanks Mark,

I will get more done on this for sure in the next few days. The weather people are calling for a few days of excessive heat and humidity so it will be spent in retreat to my basement and thus the workbench! Heheheh.
But not until I water my flowers at the tomb of the unknown soldiers here in town. Respect!
J
AlanL
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Posted: Tuesday, July 22, 2014 - 04:53 AM UTC
Hi Jerry,

The Wagon is looking excellent, love the broken wheel and the extra details.

Cheers

Al
jrutman
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Posted: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 07:30 AM UTC
Thanks Al,for remaining loyal to this build.
I got some layers of weathering accomplished. I wouldn't say done...but accomplished.
I have to give a shout out to Italerei. That big decal on top is from a 40 year old kit!!! And it worked!!





It will blend in more when I get to weathering the top. I want to make sure it's dry first!!!
Can you guess which cross is painted on?
In the lower left corner you can see the tactical symbol for a horse drawn ambulance vehicle in the 1054th GrenRegt which was in the Falaise cauldron. I figured this old old vehicle was originally dark grey and repainted in dark yellow while retaining the square with the tak symbol on it.
Anyway,getting there.


And yes Romain (as you miss NOTHING) I will be snuggling the red cross decal on the side into the cracks between the boards. Hahaha.
I like the dichotomy of the bullet holes in the red cross vehicle. Sort of sums up Normandy.
J
1stjaeger
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Wien, Austria
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Posted: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 09:15 AM UTC


Hi Jerry,

wish it could be true (that I miss nothing, that is)!

But you are right, the red crosses struck me indeed!

Your weathering is so subtle, yet so effective...a real lesson for us all!!!

This is going to be a fantastic scene!!

Anticipated congrats bro!!!!

Cheers

Romain

AlanL
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Posted: Wednesday, July 23, 2014 - 09:48 AM UTC
Hi Jerry,

The wagon looks suitably crook and the wear and tear is coming along very nicely. One though, would the back doors not be open? I wouldn't like to be bolted inside, but there again I might not be in a position to care.

The splintered wood on the front looks excellent and fine work on the decals.

Keep it coming.

Cheers

Al