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Early Aviation
Discuss World War I and the early years of aviation thru 1934.
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REVIEW
Albatros D.I - D.Va
JackFlash
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Colorado, United States
Joined: January 25, 2004
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Posted: Friday, August 13, 2010 - 01:05 PM UTC

This new addition to Kagero''s Legends of Aviation series (#5) focuses on the Albatros fighter. Entering the war in January 1917 the Albatros D.III and later D.V & Va series became the back bone of Germany’s Fliegertruppen. It also served in the Austrian and post war Polish fighter squadrons.

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If you have comments or questions please post them here.

Thanks!
FigureMad
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England - South East, United Kingdom
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Posted: Thursday, September 23, 2010 - 09:22 PM UTC
Hi Stephen

This is not a bad book, I bought it at the weekend, I am a little confused though, here is my question if you or anybody else could answer it, on the back cover it shows a brilliant colour scheme of a Oefag DIII, 253.64, with the swirl camo on the upper flying surfaces and fuselage, stating it was flown by Kpr. Geza Keisz, it also carry’s a large white number 6 on the sides and unusual sight of both types of cross. Now on Page 46, it shows the very same aircraft with lower right wing damage, but states a pilot by the name of Stfw. Friedrich Hefty, I understand that both pilots could have flown it, but it states its flown by one on page and the other on another page, just wondering if one or both were correct. As personalisation of the aircraft was very common, you perhaps would have expected some changes between pilots, but these both seem to have the same markings .......

Thanks for the review

Dave Maddox
CaptnTommy
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Posted: Friday, September 24, 2010 - 07:37 AM UTC
The Austrian D-IIIs were shared in the squadrons, even the ones with personal markings. Also if one or the other pilot was transfered out (or KIA or WIA) the plane would stay.

Also the sworl pattern was seen on several Austrian aircraft, it was a "common" camo style, (though it must have been hell to apply).

"Aces of the Austro-Hungarian Empire" by Dr. Martin. is my reference.

Captn Tommy
FigureMad
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Posted: Friday, September 24, 2010 - 08:42 AM UTC
Thank you very much for the info, most helpful

Dave