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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Right color for drybrushing Olive Drab
panzerman
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Poland
Joined: April 10, 2002
KitMaker: 37 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 03:00 PM UTC
Hey gang,

I'm just curious, what colour do you use for drybrushing US Olive Drab on your armor models? I drybrushed recently my Dragon Wagon tandem winch with lighter shade of green oil paint (mixed with amount of black to achieve a darker color shade match to OD). I ended up with the winches having all their edges accented in lighter green, but simultaneously all the winches subassembly turned more green than OD when looking on the whole painted DW model. Seems that i ruined it
So guys, is the white a better colour for drybrushing OD? Any suggestions how to fix my fault in painting the winches?

Thanks for help,
Peter
Tin_Can
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Florida, United States
Joined: January 26, 2002
KitMaker: 1,560 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 07:35 PM UTC
At the last IPMS meeting, one of the members did a demo about drybrushing and mixed white and yellow ochre oils to use on OD painted artillery pieces. It turned out pretty good.
CaptainJack
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Luxembourg, Belgium
Joined: March 17, 2002
KitMaker: 793 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 09:01 PM UTC
If you went "over ze top" with the light green try to use a wash of burnt sienna, or burnt umber to bring those rascally highlights back into line. A good rule of thumb is to shoot for something that is complementary, in this case yellow ochre, as it carries a brown hue (contained in the OD), alternatively for the really high highlights you can resort to naples yellow. In tableau painting, we hardly ever resort to greens straight from the tube as they are much too transluscent. You could also try an alternative of making a first pass by making a lighter shade of OD from: Prussian blue, Yellow ochre, and burnt umber. Use a little more yellow ochre for the highlight shade.

HTH

Jack :-)
panzerman
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Poland
Joined: April 10, 2002
KitMaker: 37 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 08, 2002 - 09:48 PM UTC

Quoted Text

If you went "over ze top" with the light green try to use a wash of burnt sienna, or burnt umber to bring those rascally highlights back into line. A good rule of thumb is to shoot for something that is complementary, in this case yellow ochre, as it carries a brown hue (contained in the OD), alternatively for the really high highlights you can resort to naples yellow. In tableau painting, we hardly ever resort to greens straight from the tube as they are much too transluscent. You could also try an alternative of making a first pass by making a lighter shade of OD from: Prussian blue, Yellow ochre, and burnt umber. Use a little more yellow ochre for the highlight shade.

HTH

Jack :-)



Jack

Thanks for your tip it is really helpful :-)

Cheers,
Peter
ProjectPhoenix
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United Kingdom
Joined: May 20, 2002
KitMaker: 32 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2002 - 05:46 PM UTC
I notice that everyone seems to use oils for drybrushing, what about acrylics? I use acrylics for drybrushing wargames figures and the results are great. Is there a little bit of wisdom that I'm missing here?

Phil
penpen
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Hauts-de-Seine, France
Joined: April 11, 2002
KitMaker: 1,757 posts
Armorama: 929 posts
Posted: Tuesday, May 21, 2002 - 08:45 PM UTC
I've been using acrilics and I don't like them because they dry too fast.
After a few minutes, you need to clean your brush and restart... I prefer to
use enamels.
Kencelot
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Florida, United States
Joined: December 27, 2001
KitMaker: 4,268 posts
Armorama: 2,804 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 04:37 AM UTC
If you're doing the dry-brushing in steps, certainly start with a little yellow mixed with the original OD. As you gradually finish the dry-brushing, adding a little white to the OD will work for the highest points or sharpest edges.

I too use acrylics for all phases of painting. You can add several different products to retard or slow the dry time of the acrylics. Golden Acrylic Mediums is one company that makes a few different types for this. Liquitex Acrylic Mediums is another.
You could even add a little (and I mean very little) bit of dish detergent to slow the dry time.
ProjectPhoenix
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United Kingdom
Joined: May 20, 2002
KitMaker: 32 posts
Armorama: 0 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 09:43 PM UTC
Forgive my ignorance but why do you want the drybrushed paint to dry slowly? When I drybrush miniatures the dries instantly and that's fine by me.

Phil
screamingeagle
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: January 08, 2002
KitMaker: 1,027 posts
Armorama: 595 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 10:43 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Forgive my ignorance but why do you want the drybrushed paint to dry slowly? When I drybrush miniatures the dries instantly and that's fine by me.

Phil



Hi Phil, It just goes to show that every modeler has his/her own preference.
Whatever one is comfortable with, I find works best.
I do think the majority drybrush with a oil - enamel mix, which does take a bit
longer to dry . I prefer the results of oil drybrushed detail, but
I used acrylics with good results too.
- ralph
screamingeagle
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: January 08, 2002
KitMaker: 1,027 posts
Armorama: 595 posts
Posted: Wednesday, May 22, 2002 - 10:47 PM UTC

Quoted Text

At the last IPMS meeting, one of the members did a demo about drybrushing and mixed white and yellow ochre oils to use on OD painted artillery pieces. It turned out pretty good.



This would be my prefered method.
THUMBS-UP TIN !!!
- ralph