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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Cleaning Your Airbrush
kaysersose
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: May 05, 2009
KitMaker: 86 posts
Armorama: 83 posts
Posted: Thursday, June 10, 2010 - 01:58 PM UTC
um, I'd be careful with the brake fluid, as it might attack some 'chemically' different rubbers than what's in a brake system... and we really don't know what kind of rubber/s and plastic/s are in the airbrush, do we?

Writing Pennzoil...'excuse me, does your DOT 4 fluid attack the seals in my Iwata T1000?'.... they'd have no idea. !

Such a shame, as brake fluid is SUCH a nice stripper...
parrot
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: March 01, 2002
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Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 10:31 AM UTC
I would take Matts advise.
I 've had my new airbrush for over 6 months and I always spray Windex through it and then some distilled water.
I only use acrylics with it and I haven't had any clogging yet.
04090
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: September 13, 2006
KitMaker: 257 posts
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Posted: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 - 10:06 AM UTC
04090
Hi Wain
I think you will get the distilled water at Asda and
what is wides in the states is windolien in the UK .
yours Cyril
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: April 02, 2005
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Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 - 02:34 PM UTC
Eric,
I know that DOT 3 brake fluid strips models of enamel paint very well, but I've never heard of cleaning an airbrush in it. However, the seals and cups in brake systems are made out of rubber, so I don't know if it would eat the O rings or the packing. It sounds like it would be safe but only time will tell.
No matter what paint you use it's a really, really bad idea to let paint dry in your airbrush.
zemzero
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Ohio, United States
Joined: May 28, 2005
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Posted: Monday, March 29, 2010 - 12:29 PM UTC
I'm a bit unruly in my airbrush cleaning and one night, not wanting to spend a whole lot of time on cleaning the week old enamel paints, I decided to brave it and used brake fluid to clean.

It did a remarkable job, faster and cleaner than other methods, but is it safe for the airbrush and o-rings? I...ahem...forgot about it one night and it ended up soaking for about 15 hours, but it came out fine. Just worried about the o-rings.
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
Joined: October 04, 2009
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Posted: Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 07:51 AM UTC
I sure will ,Matt.
I'll keep in touch as you are a font of knowledge about many things.
I've read a few of your threads & have been mightily impressed with your answers.
Talk soon.
Joe.
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: April 02, 2005
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Posted: Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 07:33 AM UTC
You're welcome Joe. I'm sure Tom and the club will get you up and running. Their collective knowledge is a priceless resource, make good use of it!
joegrafton
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 06:33 PM UTC
Hi Matt,
Thanks for the info. I'm going to go out & invest in a couple more airbrushes & other bits & pieces that you've mentioned. I'll give you a shout when I've got them!
I'm going to get a hands-on display by Tom & the guys at his club. I think it's much better to actually have the airbrush in front of you so that an expert can explain exactly what he is talking about by pointing to the part in question so I know exactly what he is talking about.
I do really appreciate your help & look forward to asking your help in the future.
All the best to you, Matt.
Joe.
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 01:04 PM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Matt,
Thanks for the tips. Looks like I'll be investing in more stuff then! Will I need more than 1 compressor?
Tell me a little bit more about pre-adjustment handles & micro control valves.
Anything to make life much easier I'm interested in.
If you like, you can PM me with the info & point me towards the right airbrushes & other airbrush tools I will need.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Joe.


Hi Joe,
No, you only need one compressor. If you go to the auto parts or hardware store, you can get 1/4" quick release fittings for your compressor and hoses. Then you can switch in a second. I have a hose for each brush and a male fitting for each hose. However, you can also buy the much smaller Iwata quick release fitting for the airbrush end of the hose, and put an Iwata male fitting on each airbrush. Then you only need one hose and you can change at the airbrush, not down at the compressor. Looking back, that's probably what I should have done.
Pre-set handle - all Iwatas except the Revolution and Eclipse lines come with pre-set handles standard. This is the handle of the airbrush with the little knob at the back. The knob limits needle travel, and thus allows you to pre-set the amount of paint that comes out when you pull back the trigger.
MAC valve - Tom took care of explaining this one. You can set your air pressure on the regulator at the compressor to like 20 lbs. and adjust it from 0 to 20 at the airbrush, much more precisely than at the regulator. And you can do it without taking your eyes off your model.
SSGToms
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 10:40 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I have an Iwata HP CS and I use acrylic paints. Everytime I am done using it I run windshield washer fluid through it and just some water to clean out the cup. After reading this I will be using distilled water from now on.

I also do a complete breakdown of the air brush after every use. Once you get the hang of it, it is worth spending 5 minutes to clean it out.


Hi Miguel! Welcome to Armorama! Glad you're finding this forum useful.
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 09:43 AM UTC
Tom,
LOL
I hold you to that money back guarantee, mate!
I'm looking forward to meeting you all.
Talk soon.
Joe.
barkingdigger
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
ARMORAMA
#013
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: June 20, 2008
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 09:38 AM UTC
Joe,

If you haven't already sorted out all your airbrushing needs by then, you'll find the collective brain of the club has a wealth of knowledge, experience, and fisherman's tales to offer! (Free advice comes with a full money-back guarantee...)

See ya soon,

Tom
CaptGrim
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Texas, United States
Joined: March 16, 2010
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 09:28 AM UTC
I have an Iwata HP CS and I use acrylic paints. Everytime I am done using it I run windshield washer fluid through it and just some water to clean out the cup. After reading this I will be using distilled water from now on.

I also do a complete breakdown of the air brush after every use. Once you get the hang of it, it is worth spending 5 minutes to clean it out.
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 09:22 AM UTC
Hi Tom,
Thanks for the pointer. I'll get on to that right now.
Nice to hear from you again, by the way.
I'll be in touch in a couple of weeks regarding the Barking meeting.
All the very best to you.
Joe.
barkingdigger
Staff MemberAssociate Editor
ARMORAMA
#013
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 09:03 AM UTC
Joe,

Have a look at the Airbrush Company, based on the south coast (www.airbrushes.com) as they sell the micro valves for Iwata. These screw onto the airbrush where the hose attaches, and have a screw that cuts off air flow so you can reduce effective air pressure without fiddling with the compressor. I visited their shop/warehouse last year...

Tom
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 08:25 AM UTC
Hi Matt,
Thanks for the tips. Looks like I'll be investing in more stuff then! Will I need more than 1 compressor?
Tell me a little bit more about pre-adjustment handles & micro control valves.
Anything to make life much easier I'm interested in.
If you like, you can PM me with the info & point me towards the right airbrushes & other airbrush tools I will need.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Joe.
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: April 02, 2005
KitMaker: 3,460 posts
Armorama: 2,963 posts
Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 07:23 AM UTC
Hi Joe,
As a matter of fact, I have 3 airbrushes in the rack on my bench.
An Iwata Revolution CR, .5mm nozzle.
A Tamiya HG (same brush as the Iwata HP-C+, made by the same company, BB Rich), .3mm nozzle.
A Grex XN, .2mm nozzle.
Each one has maximum and minimum limits of it's spray pattern. The CR is for large areas and base coats, the HG is for general camo and smaller areas, and the XN is for tight camo, lines, and small details.
Your Iwata Custom Micron B is a top of the line fine detail airbrush. It has a .18mm nozzle. It will spray the finest of hairlines, but even if you open it up full, it won't cover more than 3/4 of an inch wide. That's where the airbrushes with bigger nozzles come in.
By the way, My CR has a pre-set adjustment handle added, and all of my airbrushes have Micro Control Valves on them. This gives me superfine control of the paint and air flow right at the airbrush. Even if you are a skilled airbrush artist, this makes life MUCH easier.
joegrafton
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United Kingdom
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Posted: Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 05:35 AM UTC
Hi Matt,
I'm just curious but would you recommend having 2 airbrushes?
I've heard that some modellers do.
Joe.
joegrafton
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Posted: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 10:32 AM UTC
Will do Matt,
I've read a couple of your threads & I have to say tha you are a font of knowledge.
It's eye opening reading what you have to say, sometimes.
Take care for now.
Joe.
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
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Posted: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 09:48 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi Matt,
Now this is exactly what I need!
Thanks my friend, for pointing me in the right direction!
All the very best to you.
Joe.


Thanks Joe, and enjoy your new airbrush! If you get stuck, just post on this forum.
joegrafton
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Posted: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 06:55 AM UTC
Hi Matt,
Now this is exactly what I need!
Thanks my friend, for pointing me in the right direction!
All the very best to you.
Joe.
SSGToms
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: April 02, 2005
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Posted: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 06:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi fellas,
This is a great thread!
Okay, I'm a newbie at this modelling lark. Very damn newbie, in fact!
I haven't even started airbrush painting yet as I'm still in the building stage of my models.
I decided to really splash out some time ago on an Iwata Custon Micron B with an Iwata compressor but I'm scared sh*tless of using it because of what we are all talking about here in this thread!
After reading this thread it looks like I'll invest in an ultrasonic cleaner but can any of you guys give me some good advice on how to use the Iwata airbrush, clean it & keep it like new, please?
You can answer in this thread or even PM me or email me. My email you'll find in my profile.
I'm really looking forward to your help to give me some confidence for my modelling future.
Thanks a million fellas.
Joe.


Hi Joe,
As far as how to clean your Iwata and keep it like new, well, read this whole thread! I don't know what else to add!
To learn how to use your Iwata, I suggest you go here - http://www.howtoairbrush.com/
Video demonstrations, tutorials, and step by step lessons, all free! I think this is the best site on the web for airbrush lessons!
gaborka
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Borsod-Abauj-Zemblen, Hungary
Joined: October 09, 2005
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Posted: Tuesday, March 23, 2010 - 02:43 AM UTC

Quoted Text

D'oh

Quoted Text

Solvents are not recommended for soaking because they may attack the sealing rings



Left the glass part of an eyedropper sitting in laquer thinner while I airbrushed some parts. Returned to find that the thinner was eating away at the PLASTIC tray I was soaking the eyedropper in.



Yes, yes, "hot" solvents are dangerous stuff.

joegrafton
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United Kingdom
Joined: October 04, 2009
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Posted: Monday, March 22, 2010 - 12:20 PM UTC
Hi fellas,
This is a great thread!
Okay, I'm a newbie at this modelling lark. Very damn newbie, in fact!
I haven't even started airbrush painting yet as I'm still in the building stage of my models.
I decided to really splash out some time ago on an Iwata Custon Micron B with an Iwata compressor but I'm scared sh*tless of using it because of what we are all talking about here in this thread!
After reading this thread it looks like I'll invest in an ultrasonic cleaner but can any of you guys give me some good advice on how to use the Iwata airbrush, clean it & keep it like new, please?
You can answer in this thread or even PM me or email me. My email you'll find in my profile.
I'm really looking forward to your help to give me some confidence for my modelling future.
Thanks a million fellas.
Joe.
Littorio
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England - South East, United Kingdom
Joined: September 15, 2004
KitMaker: 4,615 posts
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Posted: Monday, March 22, 2010 - 11:12 AM UTC

Quoted Text

Hi
I have a few questions after reading the thread. First of all though, I have a Badger 200GF and have been using the Badger airbrush cleaner and water to clean it. I also mainly use acrylics. I want to give it a good clean as I think it maybe a bit clogged even though i clean it after each colour I use.
I'm sure I read soaking it overnight in meths or white spirits might work - any comments?
All the cleaning products mentioned are obviously American brands I've never heard of - what are the equivilent UK brands? I'm not into cleaning products but at least if I know the UK brands I can look out for them.
What kinda shops sell distilled water? Might sound daft but what about mineral water?

thanks
Mike



Mike you can get distilled water from Halfords or other motor parts shops, while 'Medea Airbrush Cleaner' is available from good airbrush shops.