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AFV Painting & Weathering
Answers to questions about the right paint scheme or tips for the right effect.
Cleaning Your Airbrush
alewar
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Canelones, Uruguay
Joined: December 27, 2006
KitMaker: 770 posts
Armorama: 762 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 02:03 AM UTC
Hi, can I use the ultrasonic cleaner with my Aztek 470?.
I mean if its necessary due the type of disasembly of this kind of Airbrush?.

TIA

Regards, Alvaro
SdAufKla
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South Carolina, United States
Joined: May 07, 2010
KitMaker: 2,231 posts
Armorama: 2,151 posts
Posted: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 - 01:07 AM UTC
Go to Google and search using the terms "Iwata Airbrush Exploded View Drawing"

Google Images::Iwata Airbrush Exploded View Drawing

In the first image that came up when I searched, your part appears to be #6, inserted into the AB with the small tab up, between the trigger #12 and a spring guide-operating rod #14. It appears to be a cam between the trigger and the needle tensioning system to control the paint flow.

HTH and Good luck,
sunburnthammer
Joined: August 29, 2007
KitMaker: 17 posts
Armorama: 6 posts
Posted: Tuesday, June 24, 2014 - 10:03 PM UTC
Talking of cleaning airbrushes, I have stripped my first (iwata clone I suspect) airbrush and this bit dropped out. I can't work out where or how it's supposed to be fitted only that it provides tension. Anyhow, I bought another iwata clone because I couldn't repair my first and vowed never to let this bit drop out. Guess what happens today. The simplistic instructions don't really indicate how to put it back correctly. Any help would be welcomed.

Ian

bgcmd59
#353
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Connecticut, United States
Joined: October 20, 2013
KitMaker: 90 posts
Armorama: 81 posts
Posted: Friday, March 07, 2014 - 06:27 PM UTC
I have had very good luck when shooting Vallejo acrylics using windshield washer solution (alcohol and I suspect a detergent) followed by distilled water between colors. I usually only do a full disassembly at the end of the session or as needed. The analogy to firearms is a good one and disassembly and reassembly causes far more wear on parts than regular use.
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
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Posted: Friday, March 07, 2014 - 12:33 PM UTC
I have found that I can run lacquer thinner through my brush, after alcohol based paints. I fill the cup about half full of lacquer thinner. After that, I run some glass cleaner then water. After each spray session, I break down the brush. I use cotton balls to clean the cup and q-tips for the rest of it. These I dampen with lacquer thinner. For the places I can't reach, I soak the brush in glass cleaner and ream with a brush. Occasionally, I soak the brush in lacquer thinner for five minutes. Such a short time does not hurt the brush. I reassemble it and run it under some lukewarm water. Looks and sprays like new, every time.
GALILEO1
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Maryland, United States
Joined: April 18, 2006
KitMaker: 1,794 posts
Armorama: 1,431 posts
Posted: Friday, March 07, 2014 - 11:32 AM UTC
Great thread!

Okay, so I need a consensus of sorts on using Windex to clean the airbrush. Should we be using it or shouldn't we?

I use Windex like most of you, I think, in that after shooting it I run lots of distilled water to make sure all the Windex is removed. Lately, however, I've been reading other airbrushing sites where just the mention of Windex as a cleaner gets people into a frenzy (even if you tell them that you use water immediately after to clean it out). They recommend never to use Windex or the such inside your airbrush.

So, are these people overacting or are they correct, for the most part? I'd like to keep my airbrushes going strong for as long as I could so being better informed as to what I put in them will help in this regard.

Thanks! Rob

metooshelah
#011
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Jerusalem, Israel
Joined: February 06, 2009
KitMaker: 1,506 posts
Armorama: 1,304 posts
Posted: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 01:33 AM UTC
For what they worth, here's a how-to and videos I've made on the subject:

http://www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=3131

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=c4-feed-u&v=UB7foX6mSS0

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=relmfu&v=QURv1Xg0OtI
struman1
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United States
Joined: August 12, 2013
KitMaker: 10 posts
Armorama: 8 posts
Posted: Monday, August 19, 2013 - 01:44 PM UTC
I clean my every time. It takes 5 minutes and I never worry about spits and spatters
TotemWolf
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Oklahoma, United States
Joined: February 11, 2013
KitMaker: 294 posts
Armorama: 196 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2013 - 02:52 AM UTC
With my Badger 105 I can strip it, clean it and reassemble it in just over a minute.
Why not do so ever time I'm done for the day?
wrhouston
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Scotland, United Kingdom
Joined: January 04, 2007
KitMaker: 20 posts
Armorama: 16 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 23, 2013 - 02:29 AM UTC
For all the time it takes, I've found it better to strip and clean my airbrushes after busing each clour.

iakarch
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Louisiana, United States
Joined: May 19, 2007
KitMaker: 459 posts
Armorama: 421 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 02:43 PM UTC
Using hot solvents can damage the packing and any o ring seals in the airbrush.
Snorri23
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Ontario, Canada
Joined: March 25, 2010
KitMaker: 514 posts
Armorama: 261 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 01:26 PM UTC
I have several airbrushes, collect them. I personally take my needle out,paint galleries and clean the cup after each use. As for mineral spirits that is what I use to thin mm and humbrol with. Lacquer thinner is hot and I use it sparingly to do a through clean. By taking the needle through the back of the body you can damage the tip of the needle and track the residue paint through the body. Taking it through the front will eliminate these problems. By keeping things clean will eliminate ruined painting and will allow one to have endless, carefree usage.
iakarch
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Louisiana, United States
Joined: May 19, 2007
KitMaker: 459 posts
Armorama: 421 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 01:12 PM UTC
I use only water based paints now and find 91% Isopropyl Alcohol works well as a cleaner but you have to be careful with it. Also dawn dishwasher soap diluted in water works better than airbrush cleaner made my media and others. As others have said a strip down cleaning is the best. A set of brushes made for the purpose makes it easy.

I read in an earlier post that someone uses MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) DO NOT USE THIS! A MASK IS NOT ENOUGH IT CAN BE ABSORBED THROUGH YOUR SKIN AND MOST GLOVES. ITS ONE OF THE MOST DANGEROUS SOLVENTS MADE. AS AN ARCHITECT I SPEAK FROM EXPERIENCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY.
McIvan
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New Zealand
Joined: November 18, 2009
KitMaker: 64 posts
Armorama: 12 posts
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 12:51 PM UTC

Quoted Text


Quoted Text

I paint with both enamel and acrylic paints.

After I'm done spraying, I remove my cup and add a few drops of the appropriate thinning solution and spray that. After that I spray a bit of water until all paint/color is gone and only water comes out.

Then, after every painting session, I take my AB apart and use a few cutips (the earcleaning thingies) to clear most of the inside. Then it goes for a dive in the ultrasonic, usually paint still comes out then. Whole cleaning session shouldn't take more than 10 minutes but your AB will live a lot longer.



What are you using in your ultrasonic cleaner? I have disassembled my Iwata, put it into a glass jar with lacquer thinner and then put the jar into the ultrasonic pan which contains water. Unfortunately this has given me a sticky trigger which I have yet to have figured out how to keep it from sticking after I press it down for air. I'm afraid I might have damaged something in the air valve area as even Iwata lubricant doesn't seem to help.

If cleaning in only distilled water does the job cleaning it with any type of paint, I'll try that next time.



I had the same sticky trigger after a long soak in lacquer thinner. I'd removed the o-eing inside the brush, but I'd forgotten a rubber o-ring where the air hose attached....which is where the air-flow trigger pushes down......and the lacquer thinner had attacked it.

In time it seems to have recovered. Lesson learned...I won't forget it again.
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
Armorama: 7,843 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2013 - 11:30 AM UTC
Now, after much disgust with having to tear down my ab, I run a 1/3 of acetone through it. Most modern rubber o-rings are resistant to corrosives. I only take it apart after about twenty uses.
Blucop
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Wisconsin, United States
Joined: January 03, 2005
KitMaker: 268 posts
Armorama: 252 posts
Posted: Saturday, February 16, 2013 - 10:36 AM UTC

Quoted Text

I paint with both enamel and acrylic paints.

After I'm done spraying, I remove my cup and add a few drops of the appropriate thinning solution and spray that. After that I spray a bit of water until all paint/color is gone and only water comes out.

Then, after every painting session, I take my AB apart and use a few cutips (the earcleaning thingies) to clear most of the inside. Then it goes for a dive in the ultrasonic, usually paint still comes out then. Whole cleaning session shouldn't take more than 10 minutes but your AB will live a lot longer.



What are you using in your ultrasonic cleaner? I have disassembled my Iwata, put it into a glass jar with lacquer thinner and then put the jar into the ultrasonic pan which contains water. Unfortunately this has given me a sticky trigger which I have yet to have figured out how to keep it from sticking after I press it down for air. I'm afraid I might have damaged something in the air valve area as even Iwata lubricant doesn't seem to help.

If cleaning in only distilled water does the job cleaning it with any type of paint, I'll try that next time.
Jeroenimo
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Limburg, Netherlands
Joined: June 18, 2011
KitMaker: 9 posts
Armorama: 7 posts
Posted: Tuesday, January 22, 2013 - 11:56 PM UTC
I paint with both enamel and acrylic paints.

After I'm done spraying, I remove my cup and add a few drops of the appropriate thinning solution and spray that. After that I spray a bit of water until all paint/color is gone and only water comes out.

Then, after every painting session, I take my AB apart and use a few cutips (the earcleaning thingies) to clear most of the inside. Then it goes for a dive in the ultrasonic, usually paint still comes out then. Whole cleaning session shouldn't take more than 10 minutes but your AB will live a lot longer.
1721Lancers
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England - East Anglia, United Kingdom
Joined: March 21, 2012
KitMaker: 1,673 posts
Armorama: 1,640 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 04:32 AM UTC
Hi Anthony,
an airbrush is like a weapon, you have have to clean it when you stop firing, or you´ll get into trouble.
Paul
dangerdan87
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United States
Joined: September 27, 2012
KitMaker: 8 posts
Armorama: 7 posts
Posted: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 03:17 AM UTC
You can use Ammonia to clean your airbrush, but you need to dilute the crap out of it. Windex and some some airbrush cleaners (I believe) have a small amounts of Ammonia.

I always run a good amount of water through my airbrush to clear out any cleaner.
Johnzie
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British Columbia, Canada
Joined: September 15, 2012
KitMaker: 14 posts
Armorama: 14 posts
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2012 - 05:06 PM UTC
An airbrush is a fine instrument, with tight tolerances and several moving parts. clean your gun completely after every use and every paint change and it will never let you down. Whenever i hear of a person that cant shoot straight its usually the result of a dirty gun. Its a fine instrument......treat it as such.


John
Anmoga
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Spain / España
Joined: November 18, 2004
KitMaker: 441 posts
Armorama: 329 posts
Posted: Saturday, December 10, 2011 - 01:40 AM UTC
Hi to all,

I would like to know if it is safe to take out the needle through the front of the AB instead of from the back.

I was told once by the owner of a hobby shop in Spain that it was better to take it through the front. That was what I did until I bought my Iwata AB and when I did through the front found that it was possible but it was far more just than my old AB.

I am asking this because I don't want to damage my AB stupidly and since I want to start airbrushing after a long stop want to do it correctly.

The main advantage that I find taking the needle through the front is that there are far less risk in damaging the needle but after finding that the tolerances in the Iwata are smaller than my old brush don't want to risk damaging it.

Thanks in advance,
Angel
panzerbob01
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Louisiana, United States
Joined: March 06, 2010
KitMaker: 2,959 posts
Armorama: 2,790 posts
Posted: Friday, December 09, 2011 - 08:45 AM UTC
I echo Matt N. above...

I used to take my Iwata HP brushes down after each shoot, and resisted the idea of acetone... but tried it out only a couple months back and found it works quite well - the AB run sweet and the gunk is gone!

I would remind all that acetone - that lovely stuff which the missus casually uses to remove her nail-polish when she changes her mind about things is NOT something either to breathe nor expose - specially when a nice, thick freshly-pumped-out aerosol - to open flame ! Please use it with super ventilation and be safe!

Cheers!

Bob
retiredyank
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Arkansas, United States
Joined: June 29, 2009
KitMaker: 11,610 posts
Armorama: 7,843 posts
Posted: Friday, December 09, 2011 - 08:00 AM UTC
I use a Badger 150 and I used to take it apart after every use. I have since found out that I can run a little acetone through it after every use. I haven't had to disassemble it in a month. I would not recomend this for Aztec airbrushes, as the acetone may damage the plastic nozzle. My airbrush hasn't performed so well since it was new. This works for enamels, acrylics, and laquers.