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In-Box Review
135
Pnz IV ausf. H.
Panzerkampfwagen IV ausf. H (Sd.Kf.z 161/2)
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by: Andras [ SPONGYA ]

Introduction

The Panzer IV (Sd.Kf.z 161/2) was the backbone of the German armed forces throughout the war. Even though the design was quite obsolete by the end of the conflict, it was kept in service for the lack of a viable alternative. More modern tanks, such as the Panther, were never produced in large enough quantities to replace the Panzer IV, so we can see the tank evolving from an infantry support role to an up-armored and up-gunned tank-killer. Originally the Ausf H. version was planned as a stop-gap measure in 1943 until the Panther production ramps up; as mentioned the number of Panthers produced remained relatively low, so the Panzer IV was kept in service and in development. The Ausf H was probably the high water mark for the type; subsequent versions were not as sophisticated as the ausf H. About 3000 were produced, mostly as tanks. Some chasses were diverted to more specialized roles, and formed the basis of assault guns, StuGs and other vehicles.

The Ausf Hís chassis was almost unchanged from the previous version. The drive wheels and the idlers were slightly modified during the course of production, and the turret vision ports/turret access hatch vision ports were eliminated since the side-skirts obstructed the view anyway. The commanderís cupola had a single, round hatch. The some of the return rollers in later production variants were changed into all-metal rollers; since this particular kitís rollers are still all rubber, it is probably a relatively early production variant from October-November 1943.

The front armor was 80mm, the tankís weight remained about 25 tons, which already overburdened the front suspension units. (Later versions used all-steel roadwheels on the front as the rubber rims kept peeling off due to the extra weight of the added frontal armor.) The tank received a new six-speed transmission, but the increased weight meant it still had a relatively low top speed on most terrain compared to the early versions of the Panzer IV. The main armament was a 7.5cm KwK40 L/48 tank gun making it an effective tank-killer.

To increase armor protection, the tank received the characteristic side-skirts (Schurzen). They were 8mm thick, and provided an effective protection against shaped charge ammunition and smaller caliber projectiles. Later they were changed to wire mesh to save weight. The toothed rail attachment depicted on this model was also a later modification to avoid damage to the tank in case these panes detached. (They were quite prone to damage, and tore off easily as the tank moved around.) Some vehicles received Zimmerit coating against magnetic mines, and smoke candle launchers for the turret.

Zvezdaís offering is a bit strange in this respect: the side skirts have very nicely textured Zimmerit, however the hull lacks it completely. This leaves the model builder with two choices: either apply Zimmerit to the whole of the tank, or buy/fabricate new side-skirts without the coating.

Contents

The box has a typical Zvezda artwork of the tank (with the port for the gunnerís sight on the gun mantlet open, even though it is only a moulded-on detail on the actual model), depicting Zimmerit on the whole of the hull. On the back thereís a photo of the model, and some information about the tank; the side of the box shows the artwork for the other iconic WWII tanks Zvezda is producing (T-34, Tiger, Panther). Once the envelope-type outer cover is removed, there is an unmarked, sturdy cardboard box inside, protecting the model. The whole packaging is very professional and it does a good job making sure rough handling will not cause damage to the delicate parts.

Review

The model lacks any PE or metal gun barrel; itís an old-school, all plastic tank model. There are 9 sprues with 545 parts. The instructions come on a large, foldout sheet, printed black-and-white. They are easy to follow, but not always clear on the options. Thereís a choice between types of muzzle breaks, but no information on what they are, or how to choose between them; historical references on the different muzzle breaks for the 7.5cm gun will be necessary.

They follow an interesting approach: the assembly is broken down to 27 main steps showing the assembly of main units, and ďsub-stepsĒ which detail the assembly of these units. These sub-assemblies are usually detailed on the side-bar of the instruction manual, and the step numbers have designated letters attached to them (for example the assembly of the road wheels are detailed in steps 6-a and 6-b, while step 6 shows the attachment of the finished road wheels to the hull.

Step 1-3: back and front of hull
Step 4-6: running gear, tracks
Step 8-9: mudguards
Step 10-12 upper chassis
Step 16: assembly of chassis, tools, details
Step 17 side-skirt mounts
Step 18-26: turret interior and exterior
Step 27: final assembly

There are only two paint schemes offered: a winter whitewash from 24th panzer division, 1943, Eastern Front; and a summer camouflage from 12th panzer division on the Western Front, 1944. Since the tank was so ubiquitous anywhere German armor was present, there are much, much more options available.

Overall the model is quite accurate as far as I could determine (Iíve used Ospreyís, Squadronís and Fighting Armour of WWII for this review). There is little flash on the parts (the only case I found was on the drive wheel), and the detail is quite good. The weld seams are reproduced very well, the lettering on the rubber rims of the road wheels is visible (although not as sharp as on the DML and newer Trumpeter models), and the no-slip surface of the mudguards is very well done. The Zimmerit pattern on the side skirts is reproduced very well; but as I mentioned it presents the issue of having to apply Zimmerit to the hull if you plan to use it. Another issue is not specific to the Zvezda model: the side skirts are given as one unit, all the armour plates moulded as one part. If you wish to depict them in a more realistic position, you will have to separate the different plates (shouldnít be a problem). The thickness is quite out-of-scale, too, but once assembled it should not really be that apparent. (Iím opting for an aftermarket version, but it should be quite easy simply to use the kitís parts as templates, and fabricate new ones from sheet styrene. (The artwork on the box correctly shows the tank with missing panels.)

The model is supplied with a one-piece gun barrel; no need for trying to fit two halves together. Those ďold-schoolĒ gun barrels essentially meant an automatic purchase of a metal replacement; fortunately itís not necessary in this case.

The tracks are link-and-length, accurate in size and very well detailed; assembly should be pretty straightforward. The suspension bogies are static; they cannot be positioned. This is less of a problem if you use the kitís tracks, but if you plan to display the model in a difficult, uneven terrain with individual tracks, it will be somewhat problematic to depict the suspension units realistically.

The turret has a partial interior which will dress it up quite nicely if you want to leave the hatches open.

Even though the model is really good in detail (especially considering its price), here are some short-cuts made by Zvezda. Some Iíve already mentioned (fixed suspension, closed gunner optics hatch on the gun mantlet), front access hatches cannot be opened; the turret box on the back is closed as well. Lots of assemblies require several sprues; it would have been a bit more comfortable to group these parts together. In general, though, the sprue layout is quite good. Since there are no interior details provided for the hull, itís not really a problem if you canít open the front hatches; however I would like to add an interior to the model, so it does make a difference for me.

One thing I could not determine was the accuracy of the tool layout. Tools on mudguards are slightly differently arranged than on the reference photos I had. This could be just a difference in production version; most photos Iíve seen had extra track links mounted individually on the mudguard, and the tools placed in slightly different configuration.

Conclusion

Overall, the model has very good detail, relatively low parts count, itís easy to assemble, cheap, for the price of making some compromises in complexity, and opportunities for customization. You CAN buy aftermarket PE, metal and resin replacement parts and individual tracks should you wish to ďkit outĒ the model, but then getting the DML models would be a cheaper alternative. The model will look very good without the extras, so they are unnecessary for the most part. The only thing I can think of that is absolutely necessary is the replacement side-skirts -or AM Zimmerit. (Alternatively you can use putty if you have time/inclination to do so.)

I have built Dragonís offering of the Pnz. IV., so I can compare the two offerings. They come from two very different philosophies: DML crams in as much detail as they can with PE, individual links, metal barrels, and the whole nine yard in a highly complex, high-tech kit. This comes with a higher price tag and a much higher part count. Zvezda, on the other hand, goes for a more budget option for both time and money with their newer kits. They provide good detail for a much lower part number and much lower price. The build is much faster and simpler; the price you pay is the compromised detailed above. In short: this is a perfect model if you donít want to spend too much money or too much time on a build, or if you are only getting into ďseriousĒ building and donít want to bother with PE and individual tracks yet -if they are willing to overlook some issues (such as the Zimmerit-dilemma). They made a very good move; they spotted a gap in the present market: good quality, cheap and easy to build models. Thereís another angle on this, too. With the present trend of expensive, highly complex kits, newcomers to the hobby (who are usually young and have no income on their own) are usually left out of the equation; it seems like Zvezdaís offerings might make it easier for them to stay in the hobby.
SUMMARY
Highs: simple assembly, good detail, well engineered
Lows: limited options, some flash, Zimmerit on side-skirts but not on hull
Verdict: recommended budget option
Percentage Rating
85%
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: 3620
  PUBLISHED: Jul 26, 2017
  NATIONALITY: Germany
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 84.87%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 82.67%

Our Thanks to Zvezda!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.
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About Andras (spongya)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I am a biologist by trade, and as a hobby I've been building scale models for the last twenty years. Recently I started to write reviews of the models I bought. These reviews are written from the point of view of an average model builder; hence the focus is on quality of the model, how easy it is to...

Copyright ©2017 text by Andras [ SPONGYA ]. All rights reserved.


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Comments

Another sad low is that the sprocket is mis-shapen. And since the parts that would have zimmerit are on the same sprue as the skirts, why didn't they just tool zimmerit on them? Only a few of the first ausf H had zimmerit on the skirts but the majority had it on the hull. This is a better kit than the ancient Italeri and is a fitting replacement for those who would opt for that kit. In many ways it is superior to the Tamiya but it is no where near the league that the new Dragon kits are (as opposed to the still readily available Imperial series/Gunze lineage kits) The link and length tracks look nice and if I can find one cheap I may get this as opposed to another Dragon kit. The Dragon kit, even for an experienced builder like myself, comes near to being obsessive-compulsive overkill. It's not so much a build as it is a long torturous process like a root-canal.
JUL 26, 2017 - 01:37 AM
I have had 12 root canals and enjoyed every one of them. Well, except the time that they had to cool the tooth and partially exposed nerve, with liquid nitrogen. Now, that is pain. But, back to the kit. As you pointed out, the tracks are more easily assemble than indi links. I do wonder, however if they will fit other kits, without surgery. It seems that Zvezda is the new Italeri, in market strategy. Marketing to beginners is a must. I have a niece and nephew that are interested, in the hobby. After a couple of snap kits, this my be their first serious build.
JUL 26, 2017 - 01:50 AM
This kit turned up at my local store at a price of over $80 (Canadian, but still). Is the age of cheap Zvezda kits gone? I also noticed that the newly packaged KV-2 is priced at $45, but the old one used to be $30.
JUL 26, 2017 - 02:54 AM
That's MSRP for you. The new reissue of the Italeri Pzkpfw IV F/G with photo etch and the new link by link tracks is similar in price. Go to eBay and you'll find both in the 30-35 USD range (And some sellers asking $65!) And I had to resist the temptation to get a Zvezda Pz IV for 19.99 and 10 postage from Lithuania.
JUL 26, 2017 - 03:18 AM
I picked up the Italeri for $25 and a PE set for $10, looks like I scored a great bargain! The Zvezda model looks like it needs a lot less work though, but not at more than three times the cost.
JUL 26, 2017 - 03:26 AM
when it comes to this company, I buy their trucks motorcycles...but save my $ up to buy better tank kits. Just my 2 cents.
JUL 26, 2017 - 09:54 AM
I did not notice sprocket issue; I guess it needs to be replaced from spares or AM. It's annoying, but not game-breaking. The Zimmerit, however, is a more important one.
JUL 26, 2017 - 10:03 PM
Just noticed it Thank you!
JUL 26, 2017 - 10:04 PM
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