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In-Box Review
135
Turan 1
Turan 1 Hungarian Medium Tank
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by: Darren Baker [ CMOT ]

Introduction

The following introduction is as supplied by Bronco Models:
The 40M Turan 1 was a Hungarian medium tank based on the Czechoslovakian Skoda S-IIC built in 1937. Unfortunately the construction of two pilot tanks was not finished until after the German occupation, when it emerged as the Skoda T-22. Two of these tanks were then passed on to ally Hungary for production, where it became known as the 40M Turan 1. The 40M weighed 18 tons and was powered by a 250bhp Manfred Weiss petrol engine which gave a road speed of 48 km/h. Armour was 50mm thick on the frontal plates giving good protection by 1941 standards. The 40M was armed with a 40mm Skoda A-17 anti-tank gun and two 7.92mm machine guns. Production was slow and only 285 tanks were completed, these did not see action until 1944. By this time 40M was no match for the Soviet T-34/85 and IS-2 battle tanks. In service the 40M was used by the 1st and 2nd Armoured Divisions and 1st Cavalry Division of the Hungarian army

Review

This release from Bronco Models is packaged in the usual manner of a card tray and separate card lid. Inside the sprues are individually sealed in plastic for the most part, the exceptions being the lower hull with the track sprues and where there are duplicate sprues; as such this model has a reasonable level of protection. Moulding quality is good overall as is usual for Bronco Models. There are a few ejector pin marks present, but I believe these will all be hidden except for those on the underside of the track guards. Looking closely at the sprues I did find a sink mark on one of the leaf springs where it is connected to the sprue, but the location of this issue is easily filled and sanded.

A nice addition to this model for the modeller is that Bronco Models has supplied a drivers position with seat and steering controls, it is not what I can call a partial interior but it does mean there is something there if the hatch is open.

The bogies on this offering from Bronco contain a large number of parts. On the positive side this parts count has provided us as modellers with a very accurate area of the model that should meet the requirements of the most discerning of us, but on the negative this is a complicated build area of the model due to a very large parts count and a number of small elements. There are two bogie assemblies for each side and I urge you to take your time to get the most from this area of the model. The wheels have a good level of detail and will rotate if you take care during assembly. The tracks for this offering are supplied as individual track links and there are 101 links per side, as such this will take some time and give a very natural look to the tracks.

The hull itself has great rivet detail liberally applied and once weathered this will add a lot eye catching areas. The track guards are thinned at the edges that provide a nice look of scale thickness to them, but as I mentioned earlier they do have a number of ejector pin marks that will need sorting on the underside. The hatches on the engine deck are all supplied as separate parts and so provide the option of having them open should you manage to source an engine. The periscopes are supplied with clear lenses to mount in the housings.

The turret on this tank is one of the most unusual designs I can recall seeing. The odd shape however is correctly replicated here from the limited information I was able to locate. Bronco Models has again supplied all hatches on the turret with the option of being open or closed, but there is no interior detail so careful placement of figures or scratch work will be required. MiniArt does do a nice set of Hungarian tank crew figures. The main gun and machine guns are simplistic in design but are again accurate from what I can see. One of the issues is again some very small parts that could detract from the enjoyment of the model build depending on your skill level and ability.

Bronco models has supplied some really nice touches to the hull and turret, but the next stages are going to really test the modeller. There are a huge number photo etched brackets to add that supports the mesh armour. The mesh armour provided in photo etched parts really makes this model stand out from the crowd, but while it is a stunning addition it is really going to test your patience. If you have the needed skills the photo etched mesh skirts are stunning .

Bronco has provided five finishing options for this model and these include late versions of the Turan 1; the difference appears to be limited to straight or angled side skirts. The five versions are:
1st Cavalry Tank Battalion, Hungary, March 1944
Unit and year unknown
3rd Tank Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Stainislav, April 1944
3rd Tank Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Hungary, 13th March 1945
Unit and Year unknown

Conclusion

This offering from Bronco Models will make for a stunning looking model if you have the ability to tackle all of the small parts and the large number of photo etched brackets. One of the finishing options is a winter white wash and if you opt for this as a heavily weathered finish with the three colour camouflage showing through it should make for a stunning model.
SUMMARY
Highs: The photo etched mesh armour make this model stand out from the crowd.
Lows: There are a very large number of small parts that will test many modellersí skills and patience.
Verdict: If you have the skills and are not afraid of hard work this will make a stunning model.
  Scale: 1:35
  Mfg. ID: CB35120
  PUBLISHED: May 27, 2017
  NATIONALITY: Hungary
NETWORK-WIDE AVERAGE RATINGS
  THIS REVIEWER: 87.16%
  MAKER/PUBLISHER: 87.97%

Our Thanks to Bronco Models!
This item was provided by them for the purpose of having it reviewed on this KitMaker Network site. If you would like your kit, book, or product reviewed, please contact us.
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About Darren Baker (CMOT)
FROM: ENGLAND - SOUTH WEST, UNITED KINGDOM

I have been building model kits since the early 70ís starting with Airfix kits of mostly aircraft, then progressing to the point I am at now building predominantly armour kits from all countries and time periods. Living in the middle of Salisbury plain since the 70ís, I have had lots of opportunitie...

Copyright ©2017 text by Darren Baker [ CMOT ]. All rights reserved.


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Comments

Funny how, in the absence of anything else, the Hungarians fielded this clanking obsolescence and expected something besides disaster for all involved. An interesting early-war subject matter, nonetheless.
MAY 29, 2017 - 02:53 PM
Sadly for the Hungarians they had to build the heavy industry necessary for producing tanks from the ground up. If fielded in 1941-2 as intended it would have fine but with all the delays in creating everything from scratch it took until 1944 when they should have been building the proposed Turan 3 with the long 75mm gun. The Germans valued the Hungarians as a most effective ally, so much they even lent them Tigers.
MAY 29, 2017 - 04:09 PM
I'd say the Tas would have been the only suitable tank for Hungary by 1944. This chassis was fundamentaly obselete even with the decent 75mm gun.
MAY 29, 2017 - 09:24 PM
Gents, this tank may have been a clunker historically, but it's great for folks who want to have Axis allies armor. For example, Georg Eyerman! And even I have a Pz, 38(t) in Hungarian service in my stash, so I'm glad to see this sort of thing coming out.
MAY 30, 2017 - 05:01 AM
Frank, I think you forgot that these tanks were never intended to be used against the "big" armies. They were only intended to fight the countries surrounding Hungary, which were similarly armed and armored. In this context they were kind of OK. When it comes to T-34s they were hopelessly outclassed. Stephen Fortunately Hungary was never valued as a dependable ally by the Germans, and were not allowed to purchase even PnzIVs. (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hungary-Unwilling-John-Flournoy-Montgomery/dp/1931313571) In fact they did not like their Hungarian allies one bit... which is a strange source of satisfaction. (If your country had to be a German ally at least it was a crappy one.)
AUG 14, 2017 - 03:56 AM
Is that so? Then how come those "crappy ones" remained faithful to the the Nazi Germany till the bitter end...?
AUG 15, 2017 - 02:27 AM
Is that so? Then how come those "crappy ones" remained faithful to the the Nazi Germany till the bitter end...? [/quote] I'm afraid that is so. I would also not describe the alliance as "faithful"... There's a lot of sources you can use if you are interested in the era -start with Wikipedia, and move to books (libraries should have them) LINK LINK LINK If you read Hungarian I can direct you to several historical works as well.
AUG 15, 2017 - 07:53 AM
I'm glad to see this finally released, I am kind of partial to the MK II myself, so I'll have to be patient.
AUG 15, 2017 - 12:13 PM
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